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Biological Sciences
Donna Starr Christen College of Healthcare, Fitness and Sciences

Biology Department Home Page

Biological Sciences (BIO)
The Dakota Wesleyan University Department of Biological Sciences provides a curriculum that enables its students to develop an appreciation for the diversity of living organisms and an understanding of their structure, function and interactions. Most courses emphasize laboratory and/or field activities.  The programs are intended to prepare students to meet the entrance requirements of graduate and professional schools, to teach biology in high school and to enter science-related careers in business, government, and industry.  The degree programs in the biological sciences can prepare students for a variety of careers.  Graduates of the department enjoy careers as physicians, optometrists, high school teachers, college professors, chiropractors, fisheries technicians, surgeons, foresters, physician’s assistants, university researchers, physical therapists and many other career opportunities in the medical and biological sciences.  In addition to the coursework requirements listed, biology candidates must complete the Major Field Test in Biology assessment exam during their last semester before graduation.

Within the biological sciences, there are three majors, and a student may additionally choose to specialize in one area of concentration within either the biology or wildlife management majors.  Students majoring in biology may choose between a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree.  Students receiving any of the B.S. Biology degrees are not required to complete a minor. There are 11 possible degree combinations within the DWU Department of Biological Sciences:

B.S. or B.A. Biology
B.S. or B.A. Biology, concentration in Cell Biology
B.S. or B.A. Biology, concentration in Organismal Biology
B.S. or B.A. Biology, concentration in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
B.A. Biology Education
B.A. Wildlife Management
B.A. Wildlife Management, concentration in Wildlife Law Enforcement

The biological sciences majors can be customized to meet the specific needs of the student.  For example, students planning to attend medical school after degree completion could work with their adviser to customize their planned electives to meet the entrance requirements of the medical school to which they plan to apply.  Pre-professional students planning to apply for medical, dental, physical therapy, occupational therapy or optometry school should work closely with their adviser in selecting electives needed as prerequisites for graduate school.  The student’s program should also be timed so that the prerequisites are completed before taking the MCAT or GRE exam.  See www.dwu.edu/biology for more information.

Biochemistry (see Chemistry)
General Science (see Chemistry)

Biology

In the spirit of a liberal arts education, a student majoring in biology at DWU has an enormous number of career options available after graduation.  Our programs can be tailored to meet the needs of a variety of career paths, such as pre-medicine, ecology, microbiology, zoology, college teaching, pre-physical therapy, pre-dentistry and environmental consulting, to name a few.  While providing a strong foundation in the sciences, the biology major provides students with the latitude to pursue their interests in the life sciences.

The biology program provides a broad knowledge of the unity and diversity of life, while providing practical, hands-on experiences.  To enhance the ability of students to transition easily into their career, the biology curriculum includes numerous laboratory activities and a capstone experience of research and/or an internship that relates to the student’s career goals.  These research and internship experiences can start as soon as the summer following the freshman year.  Biology majors at DWU have completed internships with biomedical laboratories, the South Dakota Department of Game, Fish, and Parks, zoos, and pharmaceutical companies.  Moreover, students have completed research that was presented at professional scientific meetings, as well as published in peer-reviewed scientific journals.  Such experiences can potentially lead to permanent positions following graduation.

Students at DWU are encouraged to think globally and consider learning opportunities that are not traditionally available on campus.  Students have worked at nationally recognized laboratories throughout the United States, traveled to study the tropical rainforests of Belize and studied marine biology in the Virgin Islands.  Endowed funds are available to support such activities.   For more information on scholarships and other funding opportunities, see www.dwu.edu/biology.

Major
B.S. Biology
Biology Core:

BIO 120 Principles of Biology I* 4
BIO 122 Principles of Biology II* 4
BIO 315 Genetics 4
BIO 316 Evolutionary Biology 3
BIO 319 Animal Development  or  
BIO 341 Biochemistry I  or  
BIO 346 Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology 4
BIO 400 Research** or  
BIO 450 Internship** 3
BIO Electives *** 14
  Total 36

Scientific Core:

CHM 164 University Chemistry 3
CHM 166 University Chemistry Lab 1
  Two of the following chemistry courses:  
CHM 174 University Chemistry II  or  
CHM 323 Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis  or  
CHM 331 Organic Chemistry I 8
MTH 200 Statistical Methods I 3
MTH 210 Calculus I 5
PHS 260 University Physics I 4
  Total 24

* A CLEP test is available for BIO 120 and BIO 122.
** Biology capstone experience.
*** Electives may be focused into an area of concentration (see below).

B.A. Biology
Biology Core:

BIO 120 Principles of Biology I* 4
BIO 122 Principles of Biology II* 4
BIO 315 Genetics 4
BIO 316 Evolutionary Biology 3
BIO 400 Research** or  
BIO 450 Internship** 3
BIO Electives *** 15
  Total 33

Scientific Core:

CHM 164 University Chemistry 3
CHM 166 University Chemistry Lab 1
CHM 174 University Chemistry II  or  
CHM 331 Organic Chemistry I 4
MTH 200 Statistical Methods I 3
  Total 11

* A CLEP test is available for BIO 120 and BIO 122.
** Biology capstone experience.
*** Electives may be focused into an area of concentration (see below).

Concentrations within the Biology Major

The concentrations within the biology majors are designed to focus a student’s curriculum into a more concentrated field of the biological sciences while still providing a well-rounded education in biology.  Such concentration can make a DWU biology graduate more marketable for jobs within the area of the concentration, as well as better prepared for graduate school within areas related to a student’s concentration.

For the biology major without a concentration, only 14 credit hours (minimum) of biology electives are required for the B.S. option, and only 15 credit hours (minimum) are required for the B.A. option. Students who would like to add a concentration to their biology major must complete the core courses for the biology major, as well as the courses required for the chosen concentration and additional chosen electives specifically listed under the concentration.  This results in an increase from 14 minimum  credit hours of electives for a B.S. biology degree (15 minimum credit hours for a B.A. biology degree) without a concentration, to a minimum 22 credit hours of elective biology courses:

  • 12 credit hours of required courses listed for the concentration
  • 3 credit hours (minimum) of additional required electives chosen from the list specific to the concentration
  • 7 credit hours (minimum) of additional electives from each of the other two concentration areas

No more than one area of concentration may be chosen by a student, and any student from a previous academic catalog (i.e., before the 2010-2011 academic year) who would like to add a concentration to their B.S. or B.A. biology degree must also take BIO 315 (four credit hours) and BIO 316 (three credit hours), and neither of these courses may be used to substitute for the required courses or for the elective courses within any concentration.  All B.A. biology majors, whether with or without an area of concentration, are required to have a minor; the B.S. biology major, whether with or without an area of concentration, does not require a minor.

Concentration in Cell Biology

The concentration in cell biology prepares students for careers and postgraduate work in molecular or cell biology, particularly in the allied health fields or the biological sciences.  Students who select this concentration are interested in cells, genetics and processes within organisms.  Biology majors with this concentration may seek employment in the private, public or nonprofit sector, with possible employment opportunities that include researcher, lab technician, college professor or medical assistant.   Other students may continue their education in a wide variety of professional and graduate programs.

BIO 222

Microbiology

4

 

BIO 341

Biochemistry I

3

 

BIO 346

Introduction to Molecular and Cell Biology

4

 

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 220, BIO 319, BIO 344

3

minimum

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 203, BIO 217, BIO 323, BIO 324 
and

 

 

 

Select a different one of the following:
BIO 217, BIO 302, BIO 323, BIO 324, BIO 325, BIO 326

 

7

 

minimum

 

Total

     22

minimum

Concentration in Organismal Biology

The concentration in organismal biology covers the branch of biology that studies the behavior, composition and organization of organisms from the molecular and genetic level to the level of the entire organism.  Students choosing this concentration are interested in animal and/or plant sciences, how organisms are identified and classified, how an organism’s structure is related to its function, and the general biology of organisms.  Many of the courses with laboratories within the concentration have significant field components to provide a balance of traditional laboratory and field components.   Possible careers may include microbiology, field biology, botany, research, zoology and museum curating.  Other students may continue their education in a wide variety of professional and graduate programs.

BIO 203

Comparative Zoology

4

 

BIO 217

Botany

4

 

BIO 222

Microbiology

4

 

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 220, BIO 319, BIO 323, BIO 324

3

minimum

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 341, BIO 344, BIO 346 and

 

 

 

Select a different one of the following:
BIO 302, BIO 325, BIO 326

7

minimum

 

Total

22

minimum

Concentration in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The concentration in ecology and evolutionary biology is designed for students interested in a broad perspective of the biological sciences, ranging from individual organisms and populations to ecosystems and the entire globe.  Courses within the concentration focus on the interactions and evolutionary history of organisms and populations of organisms, as well as the biotic and abiotic interactions and functions of ecosystems, biomes and the biosphere.  Most courses within the concentration have outdoor lab components that provide practical, hands-on field experience.  Possible careers may be found in the public, private and nonprofit sectors and include field biology, university research, environmental consulting, ecology and pest management.  Other students may continue their education in a wide variety of graduate and professional programs.

BIO 217

Botany

4

 

BIO 302

Ecology

4

 

BIO 326

Limnology

4

 

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 323, BIO 324, BIO 325

3

minimum

Electives:
Select one of the following:

 

BIO 222, BIO 341, BIO 344, BIO 346   and

 

 

 

Select a different one of the following:
BIO 203, BIO 220, BIO 222, BIO 319

7

minimum

 

Total

22

minimum

Wildlife Management

Wildlife Management Home Page

The Bachelor of Arts program in wildlife management is designed to prepare students for employment as wildlife biologists, conservation officers, fisheries biologists, managers of game farms, consultants and zookeepers.  The curriculum is designed to give the student a broad understanding of the fundamentals of science necessary to understand the interactions between organisms and their environment.  Wildlife managers also recognize that humans are an integral part of our world and that we can preserve fish and wildlife populations through sustainable practices such as fishing, hunting and habitat manipulation. 

Most courses in the program include hands-on laboratory and field activities to give students real-life experience in identification of wildlife, and techniques that are used to study their populations, such as trapping, radiotelemetry and sampling of habitat characteristics.  An important part of the program is the internship, in which students obtain experience working in an area of interest.  DWU students have obtained internships with agencies such as the Department of South Dakota Game, Fish and Parks, and the National Parks Service conducting activities ranging from the spawning of paddlefish to working with landowners to prevent Canadian geese from damaging crops.  Competition for permanent positions in this field can be intense, therefore, the practical experience and professional contacts made through such internships can prove invaluable when seeking a permanent position.

Students at DWU are encouraged to think globally and consider learning opportunities that are not traditionally available on campus.  Students may apply for endowed scholarships to help defray the expenses of volunteer activities for which they can receive internship credit or receive credit for coursework taken at field stations in the U.S. or abroad.  In the past, DWU students have studied tropical rainforest ecology in Belize, and marine biology in the Virgin Islands, and have attended workshops in Maine.  For more information on scholarships and other funding opportunities, see www.dwu.edu/biology.

Major
Wildlife Management

BIO 120 Principles of Biology I 4
BIO 122 Principles of Biology II 4
BIO 203 Comparative Zoology 4
BIO 217 Botany 4
BIO 302 Ecology 4
BIO 315 Genetics 4
BIO 316 Evolutionary Biology 3
BIO 325 Principles of Wildlife Management 3
BIO 450 Internship* 4
Electives BIO 323, BIO 324 or BIO 326 8
  Total 53

Scientific Core:

CHM 164 University Chemistry 3
CHM 166 University Chemistry Lab 1
CHM 174 University Chemistry II 4
MTH 200 Statistical Methods I 3
  Total 53

*Wildlife Management capstone experience

Concentration in Wildlife Law Enforcement
The concentration in wildlife law enforcement makes the wildlife management major at DWU the only program in South Dakota designed specifically to provide students with a background in criminal justice and communication.  These two areas are essential for the success of wildlife law enforcement.  The concentration in wildlife law enforcement is specially designed for students interested in a career as a conservation officer.  Conservation officers protect wildlife populations, ensure fair and equitable use of natural resources, protect state property and enforce hunting and fishing laws.  They also contact thousands of sportsmen and women in the field, perform fish and wildlife surveys, work with nuisance wildlife, and teach classes on wildlife management, hunter education, trapping and fishing.  Wildlife law enforcement officers must make arrests, execute search warrants, investigate reported violations, prepare affidavits and testify in court.  Wildlife officers are often called upon when a wild animal has become a nuisance in a populated area.  Other activities may include conducting hunter bag checks, creel censuses and transplanting of fish populations. 

This concentration may be used as a minor only by students majoring in wildlife management.  The wildlife law enforcement concentration is designed to give the students a working knowledge of the American legal system, including criminal investigation techniques, arrest procedures and the communication skills needed in working with the public.  The success or failure of wildlife law enforcement frequently rests on the interpersonal skills of the officer.  To accomplish this, the concentration provides students with practical experience that prepares them for a challenging career as a wildlife manager and conservation officer. 

CRJ 210 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
CRJ 250 American Legal System 3
CRJ 261 Criminal Law 3
CRJ 385 Criminal Investigation 3
CRJ 395 Criminal Procedure 3
CTH 210 Interpersonal Communication or  
ENG 312 Advanced Expository Writing 3
  Total 18

Biology Education
DWU’s biology education program provides well-educated teachers to address the nationwide shortage of science teachers.  Biology teachers guide students through the process of scientific discovery while teaching them the fundamentals of the scientific method.  This major is designed for students who want to teach biology to students of various ages, particularly 7-12 science-biology.  The curriculum combines biology and education courses that include such topics as botany, ecology, microbiology, technology in the classroom, lesson planning and educational psychology.

The biology education major meets the goals and criteria of the National Science Teachers Association’s (NSTA) “Standards for Science Teacher Preparation,” Section C, Recommendations for Secondary Science Teachers, including preparing teachers to help students understand the unifying concepts of science.  These concepts include an understanding of Section C.1. Recommendations for All Secondary Science Teachers:

  • the multiple ways the perceptions of the world are organized;
  • the use of scientific evidence and the scientific method;
  • how measurement can organize observations of constancy and change;
  • evolution and the factors that result in evolution, and the evidence supporting evolution; and
  • the interrelationships of living and nonliving systems.

Moreover, the biology education curriculum meets all standards in the NSTA Recommendations for Teachers of Biology (Section C.2.), including criteria for core competencies (Section C.2.a), for advanced competencies (Section C.2.b), and for supporting competencies (Section C.2.c).  By meeting all NSTA standards, all South Dakota teaching standards for biology education are also met (ARSD 24:53:07:10. 7-12 Science Education Program).

The biology education major stresses hands-on, practical knowledge.  The biology courses have numerous laboratory activities including outdoor and field components in many courses that provide first-hand experience with the scientific method and the processes of science.  The department of biological sciences also provides opportunities for research and travel that expand the learning opportunities outside the classroom experience.  These experiences can be drawn upon in the secondary education classroom to enhance teaching at the secondary education level.  DWU biology students have completed research that was presented at regional and national professional scientific meetings, as well as published in peer-reviewed scientific journals.  Biology students have worked at nationally recognized laboratories throughout the United States.  Endowed funds are available to support such activities.  For more information on scholarships and other funding opportunities, see www.dwu.edu/biology.

The courses through the DWU Department of Education provide practical classroom applications and experiences, including student teaching (see “Education” for more information on education courses and the education program and requirements).  This combination of biology and education courses provides a rigorous curriculum that helps prepare teachers for the classroom and for creating an exciting learning environment, and the broad perspective of the curriculum provides training for a variety of teaching careers.  Possible job titles for students completing this program include biology teacher, advanced biology teacher, anatomy teacher, life sciences teacher and biology researcher.

Students interested in teacher certification in science-biology need to complete the following program which constitutes both a major and a minor.  Students must earn at least a C- in all courses for the biology major or minor.  Additionally, the education program requires a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 2.6 be sustained to enroll in education courses.  The curriculum includes 37 credit hours of biology courses, 20 credit hours of additional science courses (e.g., chemistry, psychology), and 49 credit hours of education courses, including the student teaching credits.  The courses enable the teacher to teach 7-12 science-biology after passing the appropriate Praxis tests. Students may add to their certificate all science endorsements by passing the appropriate Praxis II test. For further clarification, see Education.

Major
Biology Education

Biology Core:

BIO 120 Principles of Biology I 4
BIO 122 Principles of Biology II 4
BIO 217 Botany 4
BIO 220 Anatomy & Physiology I 4
BIO 222 Microbiology 4
BIO 302 Ecology 4
BIO 305 Biology Teaching Methods 2
BIO 315 Genetics 4
BIO 316 Evolutionary Biology 3
BIO 330 Anatomy & Physiology II 4
  Total 37

Scientific Core:

CHM 164 University Chemistry 3
CHM 166 University Chemistry Lab 1
CHM 174 University Chemistry II 4
MTH 200 Statistical Methods I 3
PHS 100 Physical Science: Physics and the Atomic Nature of Matter 3
PHS 101 Physical Science: Chemistry, Earth and Space 3
PSY 237 Developmental Psychology 3
  Total 20

Education Core:

EDU 201

Foundations of Education

3

EDU 216

Technology for Teachers I

1

EDU 311

Educational Psychology

3

EDU 316

Technology for Teachers II

1

EDU 324

Literacy Methods in the Content Area

3

EDU 330

Curriculum Standards and Assessment

3

EDU 335

American Indian Education

3

EDU 356

Secondary and Middle Level Teaching Methods

3

EDU 365

Classroom Management for the K-12 Educator

3

EDU 410

Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 412

Adolescent Learners’ Needs

3

EDU 416

Technology for Teachers III

1

EDU 474

7-12 Student Teaching

14

EDU 475

Seminar

2

SPD 206

Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom

 

3

 

Total

49

 

Biology Minor
The minor in biology provides students with the fundamental knowledge of the biological sciences, including the scientific method, genetics, ecology, evolution and biological processes at the cellular and organismal levels.  This minor will help students to think critically about important biological topics such as evolution, stem cells and biology in their everyday lives.  A fundamental understanding of biology will help students comprehend biotechnology issues ranging from genetic engineering of crops to DNA fingerprinting to global climate change.  For example, a criminal justice major could use the minor to learn important forensics techniques, or a leadership and public service major could use biological concepts to help make more informed legislative decisions.  Students choosing this minor should choose courses in consultation with their adviser and the department of biological sciences to complement their major.

Minor
Biology

BIO 120

Principles of Biology I*

4

BIO 122

Principles of Biology II*

4

BIO 315

Genetics

4

BIO

Electives

8

 

Total

20

* A CLEP test is available for BIO 120 and BIO 122.

Allied Health Minor
Dakota Wesleyan University prepares students for the most important emerging careers in healthcare. DWU offers a powerful, personalized approach for future healthcare and science professionals.

This minor is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in allied health areas including, but not limited to: pre-medical, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician’s assistant, chiropractic, dentistry, optometry and pharmacology. Students in health-related occupations, including dentistry and medicine, should obtain catalogs from the schools where they intend to complete their professional programs. The faculty adviser will aid students in scheduling the courses from the university’s curriculum that fit most closely with the requirements of the professional schools. In the event that a student has not decided which professional school he/she will attend, a suggested curriculum is offered below that meets most of the requirements of standard professional schools. Each student is ultimately responsible for ensuring that his/her program of study at DWU satisfies the requirements for the professional school(s) he/she wishes to attend. All professional programs have different prerequisite courses for admittance. Students are encouraged to research these program prerequisite criteria early in their college career (during second year) to create a plan of study.

Minor
Allied Health

BIO

Two courses with labs**

8

CHM

CHM 150 or higher**

8

PSY 443

Abnormal Psychology

3

  Electives*  **    

6

 

Total

25

* University regulations state that no course may count for both a major and a minor.
** Students should consult their adviser to determine appropriate courses.
 
*Electives:

ATN 320

Human Nutrition

3

ATN 330

Pathology and Evaluation of Injury I

3

ATN 335

Pathology and Evaluation of Injury II

3

ATN 390

Therapeutic Modalities

3

ATN 395

Therapeutic Exercise

3

ATN 397

Medical Aspects and Pharmacologic Interventions I

3

ATN 398

Medical Aspects and Pharmacologic Interventions II

2

ATN 455

Administration in Athletic Training

2

BIO 315

Genetics           

4

BIO 344

Immunology

4

BIO 346

Introduction to Molecular and Cell Biology

4

CHM 174

University Chemistry

4

CHM 331

Organic Chemistry I

4

CHM 332

Organic Chemistry II

4

HLT 300

Community Health and Chronic Disease

3

MTH 200

Statistical Methods I

3

NUR 100

Medical Terminology

2

NUR 300

Pharmacology

3

NUR 302

Health Assessment and Promotion

3

PHS 260

University Physics I      

4

PHS 270

University Physics II

4

SPX 315

Kinesiology

3

SPX 410

Physiology of Exercise

3

 

Course Descriptions
101 General Biology 4 hours S
Students will examine concepts and theories in the following areas: the philosophy and methods of science, ecology, cell structure and function, genetics, and evolution. This course is intended to primarily serve those not majoring in the biological sciences.  Three lectures, one laboratory.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Science Technology and Human Experience
Note: a student who takes BIO 101 and then decides to major in the life sciences may take BIO 122 upon the consent of the instructor. If the instructor determines it is in the best interest of the student to take BIO 120, only BIO 120 will count toward the major. Any student who takes both BIO 101 and BIO 120 can only count one of these courses toward the major.

115 Environmental Science 4 hours F12
Students will study the interactions between humans and the environment. Basic principles of biology are included to provide a basis for understanding the problems of overpopulation, depletion of resources and pollution, as well as how to achieve a sustainable environment. Three lectures, one laboratory. General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking ? Science Technology and Human Experience

120 Principles of Biology I 4 hours F
Students will examine concepts and theories in the following areas: the philosophy and methods of science, ecology, cell structure and function, genetics, and evolution. This course is intended to primarily serve majors in biological sciences. Three lectures, one laboratory. General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking ? Science Technology and Human Experience

122 Principles of Biology II 4 hours S
This course includes the philosophy and methods of science, nutrition, gas exchange, internal transport, osmoregulation, chemical control, nervous control, reproduction, development, diversity, and classification of organisms. Three lectures, one laboratory. Prerequisite: BIO 120.

150/350 Readings in Biology 1 hour F, S
This course includes assigned readings and term papers in biological literature.  Students may earn a total of two hours of credit for the major or minor.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

199 Special Topics in Biology 1-4 hours TBA

200 Research 1-4 hours F, S
Independent and directed research using biological methods.  Students must choose a research activity acceptable to the department of biological sciences.  Students may take up to four credits per semester, not to exceed eight credits total, only up to two credits of which may be counted as elective credits toward a major or a minor in the department of biological sciences.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 (or concurrent enrollment), and consent of instructor.

203 Comparative Zoology 4 hours F12
Students will study the gross morphology of representative vertebrates and invertebrates.  The class will consider taxonomy, evolution, anatomy, physiology and behavior.  Two lectures, two laboratories.
Prerequisites: BIO 120 and BIO 122.

211 Human Anatomy 4 hours TBA
This is an introduction to the structure of the human body.  The class will consider a balanced study of developmental, cellular, histological and gross levels of anatomy and its application to students in health and biological sciences.  Three lectures, one laboratory.

217 Botany 4 hours F13
This course is a comparative study of the structure and reproduction of fungi and lower plants, with emphasis on seed plants.  Students will study the principles of plant classification, identification and nomenclature, including the systematic relationships of vascular plants with an emphasis on flowering plants.  Laboratories will include field trips, identification of collections and techniques used in gathering evidence for classification.  Two lectures, two laboratories. 
Prerequisites: BIO 120 and BIO 122.

220 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 hours F
This course is an in-depth study of the structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems at all levels of organization.  Topics include cell biology, histology, developmental anatomy and pathological conditions relevant to students majoring in the health sciences.  Three lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites:  Concurrent or prior enrollment in CHM 164 is strongly recommended.

222 Microbiology 4 hours S
Students will study the biology of bacteria, viruses, yeasts, molds and certain animal parasites.  Lectures and laboratory exercises cover microbiological techniques, morphology, anatomy, growth, reproduction, physiology and genetics.  Three lectures, two laboratories.
Prerequisites: CHM 164.

275 Field Experience 1-2 hours TBA
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

299 Selected Topics – Basic 1-4 hours TBA

300 Research 1-4 hours F, S
Independent and directed research using biological methods.  Students must choose a research activity acceptable to the department of biological sciences.  Students may take up to four credits per semester, not to exceed eight credits total, only up to two credits of which may be counted as elective credits toward a major or a minor in the department of biological sciences.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 and consent of instructor.

302 Ecology 4 hours F13
Students will study the principles governing the relationships of plants, animals and their environment.  Three lectures, one laboratory, including field trips.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 and MTH 200.

305 Biology Teaching Methods 2 hours TBA
This course introduces students to the texts, manuals, materials, apparatus and methods of teaching biology.  One lecture, one laboratory.  It cannot be taken as a directed study.
Prerequisites: 15 hours of biological science, including BIO 120, BIO 122, BIO 316, CHM 164, EDU 201 and EDU 356.

312 Human Physiology 4 hours TBA
This course introduces students to the mechanisms that control the functioning of the human body at the level of the cell, organ, organ system and whole body.  Three lectures, one laboratory.
Prerequisites: CHM 164.
General Education:  Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Science Technology and Human Experience

315 Genetics 4 hours F12
This is an introduction to the study of genetics using classical and molecular approaches.  Topics covered include transmission genetics, replication of DNA, gene expression and control, and population genetics.  Three lectures, one laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIO 120 and BIO 122.

316 Evolutionary Biology 3 hours S13
This course includes the history, genetic basis and products of evolutionary forces, including understanding the factors that affect evolutionary change, and the modes of evolutionary change.  This course is designed to present the evidence for evolution and its effects on populations from the molecular to the community and ecosystem level.  Three lectures.
Prerequisite: BIO 315.

319 Animal Development 4 hours F13
Students will study the development of animals through an integration of descriptive, experimental and biochemical approaches.  Topics include: gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation and formation of organ rudiments.  Two lectures, two laboratories.
Prerequisites: BIO 120 and BIO 122.

323 Mammalogy 4 hours F12
Topics covered in this course include: the evolution, taxonomy, distribution, adaptations, ecology and behavior of mammals.  Three lectures, one laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 or consent of instructor.

324 Ornithology 4 hours S14
This course involves the study of the origin, evolution, structure, behavior, adaptations, distribution and classification of birds.  Three lectures, one laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 or consent of instructor.

325 Principles of Wildlife Management 3 hours S14
This course is an introduction to the basic principles used in the management of wildlife and fish populations, their habitats and human uses.  The course is directed toward the presentation of general concepts that are integral to understanding the discipline.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122 or consent of instructor.

326 Limnology 4 hours F14
This course integrates the chemistry, physics, hydrology and ecology of freshwater ecosystems.  It also considers the human impact on these systems.  Three lectures, one laboratory, including field trips.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122, CHM 164 and CHM 166.

330 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 hours S
This course is an in-depth study of the structure and function of the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems at all levels of organization.  Other topics include fluid and electrolyte balance, acid-base balance, and pathological conditions relevant to students majoring in the health sciences.  Three lectures and one laboratory. 
Prerequisites:  CHM 164 or consent of instructor; BIO 220 is strongly recommended.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Science Technology and Human Experience

341 Biochemistry I 4 hours F13
This is the first semester of a comprehensive biochemistry course providing an introduction to the chemical and physical properties of biologically important molecules.  Topics to be discussed in this course include carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, lipids and enzymes.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122, CHM 331 or consent of instructor.

342 Biochemistry II 4 hours S14
This is the second semester of a comprehensive biochemistry course with emphasis on metabolism, energy utilization and synthesis of biologically important molecules.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122, BIO 341, CHM 331, CHM 332 or consent of instructor.

344 Immunology 4 hours F13
This course provides an introduction into the chemical, genetic and biological properties of immune responses, acquired immunity and the production of antibodies.
Prerequisites: BIO 315, BIO 341 and BIO 342, or consent of instructor.

346 Introduction to Molecular and Cell Biology 4 hours S13
This course focuses on the study of the structure and function of the cell and its subcellular components.  The course is designed to provide an understanding of membrane and cellular physiology from a molecular aspect.
Prerequisites: BIO 315, BIO 341 and BIO 342, or consent of instructor.

400 Research 1-4 hours F,S
This course involves advanced independent work using biological methods.  Students will choose a research activity acceptable to the biology department.
Prerequisites: BIO 120, BIO 122, an approved proposal and consent of instructor.

403 Research in Biochemistry 1-4 hours F,S
This course is designed to provide an introduction into the methodology and techniques used in the modern biochemistry research laboratory.  Students are encouraged to design and investigate an individual research project within the instructor’s scope of research and to present their results.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

410 Physiology of Exercise 3 hours F
(Refer to SPX 410)

450 Internship 1-4 hours F,S
Internships are available in allied health fields, biochemistry, wildlife management and other branches of biology.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

499 Selected Topics – Advanced 1-4 hours TBA

 

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