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Education, Special Education
College of Leadership and Public Service

Education Department Homepage | Teacher Certification

Education (EDU) and Special Education (SPD)
It is the responsibility of each student in the teacher education program to be familiar with and to fulfill the requirements of the department as outlined in this catalog, the Teacher Education Handbook and the DWU Student Teacher Handbook.  Please refer to the Teacher Education Handbook for the most up-to-date policies and procedures governing to program. A link to the education handbook is available on the education department’s Web page www.dwu.edu/education.

Motto
"Impacting futures ... one mind at a time."

Philosophy
The philosophy of the DWU education department is that theory and practice need to be integrated to promote excellent teaching.  Constructivism, as well as other learning theories, provide a framework to guide departmental decision-making.  Constructivism theories suggest that students generate knowledge and meaning through their interactions.  As such, the DWU teacher education program provides many applied learning experiences both in the classroom and in practicums to help prepare students to become effective teachers.  Our commitment to candidates are demonstrated through:

  • developing an academic plan and maintaining personal involvement with candidates;
  • fostering the development of professional teaching characteristics;
  • providing candidates with a sound background in current theoretical knowledge and methodology;
  • providing candidates with a variety of practical educational experiences; and
  • providing educational resources and services to candidates and regional school districts.

Mission
A constructivist-based program, the DWU education department is committed to modeling the developmental approach to learning.  A student-centered philosophy, celebrating the diversity and complexity of teaching, helps shape curricular and pedagogical decisions.  Aligned with the university’s mission to help students discern their strengths in service to God and humanity, the DWU education program integrates a strong core of liberal arts courses, a commitment to service, as well as best practices in teaching and learning to develop well prepared candidates.  The department integrates the 10 Interstate New Teacher Assessment Standards Consortium (INTASC) standards into the curriculum.

Purpose
The purpose of the teacher education program at DWU is to provide an organized, integrated system of study and experience for the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers.  The program is designed to emphasize the development of human values that enhance the quality of interpersonal relations and the skills necessary for effective instruction.  The central emphasis of the program is to develop the characteristics of competence and maturity, which will enable graduates to command respect as educated people and as members of the teaching profession.

Goal
The goal of DWU education department is to prepare competent, effective and dedicated teachers. The program will provide a liberal arts program to help candidates:

  • understand central concepts, tools of inquiry and the structure of the discipline(s) they teach, and be able to create learning experiences that make the subject matter meaningful for students;
  • understand how children learn and develop, and provide learning opportunities that support their intellectual, social and personal development;
  • understand how students differ in their approaches to learning and create instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners;
  • understand and use a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving and performance skills;
  • use understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning and self-motivation;
  • use knowledge of effective verbal, nonverbal and media communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration and supportive interaction in the classroom;
  • plan instruction based on knowledge of subject matter, students, the community and curriculum goals;
  • understand and use formal and informal assessment strategies to ensure the continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the learner;
  • be reflective practitioners who continually evaluate the effects of their choices and actions on others and who actively seek opportunities to grow professionally;
  • foster relationships with school colleagues, parents and agencies in the larger community to support students’ learning and well-being; and
  • affirm the value of diversity through experiences, study and integration of multi-cultural examination and educational application.

DWU offers the following Teacher Education Programs:

  • K-8 Elementary Education with 5-8 Middle Level
  • 7-12 Language Arts–English Education
  • 7-12 Mathematics Education
  • 7-12 Biology Education
  • 7-12 History Education
  • K-12 Music Education
  • K-12 Special Education

DWU offers the following endorsements:

  • 5-8 Middle Level Education
  • K-12 Special Education
  • 7-12 Special Education
  • K-8 Special Education

An education program is defined as all courses necessary to be certified for teaching in the state of South Dakota. Certified teachers who desire additional endorsements in other subject areas must pass the PRAXIS II exam for those areas.

Graduating with an Education Major in Four Years
There are 126 credits in an elementary education or special education major. If teacher candidates wish to graduate in four years, they will need to average 16 credits each semester while they are attending Dakota Wesleyan University. To avoid an overload, candidates are advised to take General Education courses during the summer sessions.

Admission into the Teacher Education Program
Students entering DWU may declare a pre-education major on their application.  No other education courses may be taken until candidates are formally admitted into the education program.  Exceptions to this are: EDU 224, EDU 252 and EDU 335.

Upon demonstration of the following requirements and review by the department chair, candidates will be approved to register for EDU 201:

  • complete three courses toward the General Education requirements; and
  • have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.6.

Professors and instructors in education classes require attendance.  Candidates should be aware of the necessity of dependability and punctuality.  Problems in this area could result in the applicant being denied admission to the education program.

Candidates in EDU 201 will need to apply for admission to the education program if they wish to be admitted in, and continue in, the education program.  Throughout EDU 201, standards of dependability, attentiveness to task, oral and written communication abilities, professionalism and dedication to the teaching profession are observed and evaluated.  The professor of EDU 201 will gather information and make a recommendation to the department chairman.  Upon successful completion of EDU 201, candidates will be considered for admission to the teacher education program based on the completion of the following minimum requirements:

  • cumulative GPA of 2.6 or higher;
  • a grade of at least a C in EDU 201 Foundations of Education as well as in other coursework;
  • passing scores on Praxis I (PPST) exams: Reading 171, Writing 172, Math 172
  • completion of a background check;
  • excellent attendance in all education classes;
  • three letters of recommendation from Dakota Wesleyan University professors who can attest to the candidate’s desirable personal characteristics necessary for teaching. The professors must be outside of the education department; 
  • signed acknowledgement of South Dakota State Department of Education conditions of Certificate Revocation Codified Law;
  • completion of all application forms;
  • an essay on the candidate’s philosophy of teaching and learning, as well as why the applicant wants to pursue a career in education; and
  • completion of an admittance interview if requested by the education faculty.

The recommendation process will be completed within three weeks following the end of the semester in which candidates complete EDU 201. The department chairman will send written documentation of the decision to the teacher education program candidates.

Levels of Admission

  1. Full admission – Candidates will receive full admission to the education program when they successfully complete all of the requirements for admission, including passing scores on the PPST exams.
  2. Provisional admission – If candidates have not received passing scores on the PPST exams, but have successfully completed all of the other requirements, they will receive provisional admission to the program for one semester. During the semester of provisional admission, they may take some education classes. During the semester they are provisionally admitted, they will need to receive passing scores on the PPST exams. If they do receive passing scores on the PPST exams, they may be granted full admission. If they do not receive passing scores on the PPST exams, they will be denied admission to the program.  Candidates with provisional admission to the program may not take upper level methods and block courses in education.
  3. Admission denied – Candidates will be denied admission to the program if they do not successfully meet all of the requirements for the program.

Candidates must be granted full admission to the program in order to enroll in upper level (300-499) courses in education. Candidates with provisional admission to the program will not be allowed to enroll for those courses until such a time that they are granted full admission. Individual exceptions to this would be made by the department chairman whose decision will be final.

Students who were denied admission may not take any education classes until the reasons for denial of admission have been satisfactorily addressed. However, students may request a meeting with the department chairman for review at any time, and exceptions may be made only at the discretion of the department chairman, in consultation with a petitioning candidate’s adviser.

Any education or special education class that is more than five years old, without a degree completion, will need to be retaken.  This also applies to students who are in the teacher education program and students wishing to be readmitted to the teacher education program.  Individual exceptions to this may be made at the discretion of the department chairman, whose decision will be final.

Probation
Candidates may be placed on probation in the education program if their GPA falls below a 2.6 or if there are academic issues, attendance issues, issues with behavior or attitude, or lack of professionalism. A more detailed explanation of probation in the education program may be located in the education handbook.

Professional Conduct
All candidates are expected to conduct themselves in a professional, ethical and respectful manner when it comes to their education classes. If candidates engage in academic dishonesty, they jeopardize their ability to continue in the education program. If candidates fail to conduct themselves in such a manner, they may fail the course, or may be advised to withdraw from the course, to avoid failing the course. If candidates engage in unprofessional or inappropriate conduct while doing observations/field experiences, they may not be allowed to continue the field experience and may fail the course, or be advised to withdraw from the course to avoid receiving a failing grade. Candidate may also jeopardize the opportunity to continue in the education program. If candidates fail a course or are advised to drop the course because of personal conduct, they may need to apply to be readmitted into the education program.  Some examples of unprofessional, unethical or disrespectful conduct while doing observations or fieldwork include, but are not limited to the following: dressing unprofessionally, sleeping during the observation, distracting the teacher or disrupting class, using a personal electronic device during the fieldwork, failing to notify the cooperating teacher and university professors that you will not be there or will be late, talking with students about inappropriate topics, talking about students or classroom teachers that you observe, or showing up to class under the influence of drugs/alcohol or with hangover effects.

Transfer Students
Transfer students must take EDU 201 at DWU, unless waived by the department chairman. A transfer student must make a written request with proper documentation to the department chairman for a waiver of EDU 201. All transfer students must formally apply to the education department chairman for admission to the education program. The education chairman will send written documentation of the decision to the candidates.

In the event candidates in the education program transfer to a different university/college and then transfer back to DWU and wish to be readmitted to the education program, they will need to reapply for admission. If they had not taken the PPST exams, they will be required to do so before they may be considered for readmission.

If candidates wish to transfer any education or special education course that is more than five years old, the course will not be considered for acceptance. Individual exceptions to this may be made only at the discretion of the department chairman, whose decision will be final.

Candidates Who Take a Leave of Absence
Candidates who do not enroll in education classes for at least one year (two consecutive semesters) must apply to be readmitted into the education program.  If candidates have not passed the PPST exams, they will need to do so in order to be considered for admission to the program.

Candidates who are denied admission or dismissed from the teacher education program have a right to appeal, in writing, within four weeks of the notice of denial or dismissal. The appeal is considered by an appeals board consisting of the college dean, department chairman, director of student life and an education professional.

Professional Semester
The professional semester is the semester in which candidates prepare for and participate in the student teaching experience. Candidates register for the appropriate course in EDU 470, EDU 472, EDU 474 or SPD 470. The student teaching experience will be in conjunction with a two-credit seminar that integrates materials from a candidate’s academic background and provides information, advice and direction for a successful teaching experience. Candidates will also meet in a seminar format throughout the professional semester.

The objectives, requirements and policies concerning student teaching are discussed in the DWU Teacher Education Handbook. In particular, student teaching is an opportunity to demonstrate competence in all job responsibilities. Candidates will complete a minimum of 14 full weeks (70 days) of supervised experiences. A K-12 program requires a balance of experiences at two levels in the 14-week period. Student teachers are given the opportunity for professional development through self, peer and supervisory reflection on the experience. Grades assigned for student teaching are Credit/No Credit. Grades are assigned for the two-credit seminar taken in conjunction with the student teaching experience.

Candidates need to complete an application packet for the professional semester. Applications include such materials as a letter of introduction, a resume and a list of classroom observations. This application packet must be completed following a meeting called by the department chairman in the semester preceding student teaching. Deadlines and requirements will be outlined at that meeting, including Praxis test requirements. If candidates do not attend the meeting, it will be their responsibility to contact the education office to obtain the information.  See http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.aspfor more information on the Praxis test.

Student Teaching
Candidates must reach a minimum cutoff score on all Praxis II tests pertinent to their major to achieve legal teaching certification in the state of South Dakota in addition to required coursework in all areas for which a state exam is available. Because of this South Dakota legislation which aligns South Dakota with the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, Dakota Wesleyan education majors will have to pass these examinations before they will be allowed to student teach, graduate from DWU and become certified teachers. See http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.asp for a list of what passing scores are for the different Praxis tests.

Candidates must submit passing Praxis scores as a prerequisite to student teaching. They can be submitted at any time during their tenure at DWU; however, they must be submitted at least by Oct. 31 to student teach during the following spring semester and by April 30 to student teach during the following fall semester. Candidates will not be allowed to student teach without submission of passing scores. Testing dates and locations may be found in the education office. Students deciding against submitting the necessary passing scores may appeal to the Education Policies and Curriculum Committee and request a specialized, nonteaching degree, with receipt of a waiver indicating full knowledge of lack of teaching certification due to this omission of passing test scores. Students still must meet all DWU graduation requirements to receive this specialized degree.  For more information on student teaching placement policies and student teaching admission criteria, please see the department handbook.

As a result of this certification procedure, Dakota Wesleyan University requires passage of the Praxis tests in the teaching candidate’s content and pedagogical areas as a graduation requirement.

Service Component of Education
To achieve the goal of serving regional school districts and communities, all education classes include a service task as part of the general requirements for the course.  These service opportunities will be documented in candidate’s professional portfolio.

Dakota Wesleyan University Future Teachers Organization (DWUFTO)
Candidates taking any course that requires contact with K-12 students must show proof of a comprehensive liability plan. Candidates who do not currently have a liability plan may join the DWUFTO, which offers a $1 million liability insurance program. The DWUFTO is also an active organization on campus that provides opportunities for future teachers to be involved in local, state and national education events.  For additional information please refer to the Teacher Education Handbook.

Certification
Questions regarding the Praxis tests can be found at http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.asp.  Requirements for teaching certificates vary from state to state. The elementary and secondary teacher programs at Dakota Wesleyan University are designed to meet current academic requirements for certification in South Dakota. Applications for certificates are filed with the certification officer for DWU who recommends certification to the state. Candidates must receive credit in the appropriate EDU 470, EDU 472 or EDU 474 course and receive passing scores on the appropriate Praxis II series exams. See http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.asp for minimum scores and appropriate tests.

The descriptions regarding teacher certification by the state of South Dakota contained in this catalog are based upon the requirements that exist at the date of publication. Requirements are subject to change as determined by the South Dakota Department of Education. Candidates are advised to periodically check the requirements of South Dakota, as well as any other state in which they expect to seek certification.

Candidates will be recommended for certification upon completion of a bachelor’s degree.* Successful completion of this program requires that candidates take all courses listed for credit and earn a grade of at least C.

*The federal No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) requires that each state attempt to have 100 percent of teachers reach “highly qualified” status and plan assessments to determine that status. South Dakota began using a state licensure examination on July 1, 2005. South Dakota uses the Praxis II series examination published by the Educational Testing Service. Find out more about these requirements by accessing http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.asp for state of South Dakota requirements or www.ets.org/Praxis to learn more about the Praxis II examination.

Directed Studies, Independent Studies, Credit by Examination, CLEP and Life Experience
Candidates should make a request and provide rationale for a directed study or independent study in an education course to the education department chair. Directed studies for methods courses will not be approved.  The department chair and college dean will approve or reject the request based upon the rationale candidates provide. The department chair’s and dean’s decision will be final.  Life experience will not be considered for education course credit.

Upon approval, candidates must complete an application which will require the approval of the department chair, instructor, adviser and dean. This application will be required for registration and is not complete until it is fully executed and received by the registrar’s office.

Elementary Education Program
Candidates majoring in elementary education or special education will fall under the elementary education or special education catalog and handbook requirements for the year in which they receive admission into the education program.

The elementary education program at Dakota Wesleyan University requires:

  • completion of all K-8 elementary education program courses;
  • candidates must have a grade of C or higher for successful completion of all courses (EDU 470, EDU 472 and EDU 474 are taken Credit/No Credit);
  • completion of graduation requirements, including General Education courses and at least 126 total hours;
  • meet or exceed minimum scores on appropriate PRAXIS II tests before student teaching; and
  • completion of electronic portfolio and exit interview.

Candidates completing the elementary education program are not required to complete a minor as stated in “Graduation Requirements for Bachelor of Arts.”

Elementary Education Courses
Required education courses:

EDU 201

Foundations of Education

3

EDU 216

Technology for Teachers I

1

EDU 224

Children’s Literature

3

EDU 252

Music, Movement and Art

3

EDU 311

Educational Psychology

3

EDU 316

Technology for Teachers II

1

EDU 324

Literacy Methods in the Content Area

3

EDU 330

Curriculum Standards and Assessment

3

EDU 335

American Indian Education

3

EDU 342

Social Studies Methods and Practicum

3

EDU 343

Science Methods and Practicum

3

EDU 344

Mathematics Methods and Practicum

3

EDU 365

Classroom Management for the K-12 Educator

3

EDU 380

Evidence-Based Reading K-3

3

EDU 382

Evidence-Based Reading 4-8

3

EDU 410

Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 412

Adolescent Learners’ Needs

3

EDU 416

Technology for Teachers III

1

EDU 472

Elementary School Student Teaching

14

EDU 475

Seminar

2

 

Total

64

Additional required courses:

BIO 101

General Biology

4

HIS 201

U.S. History I    or

 

HIS 202

U.S. History II

3

HLT 232

Health Education

3

MTH 125

College Algebra

3

MTH 150

Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher

3

PHS 101

Physical Science: Chemistry, Earth and Space

3

POL 153

U.S. Government

3

PSY 237

Developmental Psychology

3

SPD 206

Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom

3

 

Electives*

6

 

Subtotal

34

*Possible Electives

ENG 312

Advanced Expository Writing

3

ENG 342

English Grammar

3

PSY 337

Adolescent Psychology

3

Additional electives available in consultation with the chairman of the education department

General Education support courses are listed under the five foundational pillars for the College of Leadership and Public Service. The pillars can be found in “Academic Programs.”  A grade of C or better is required for all General Education courses.

5-8 Middle Level Education Endorsement
The South Dakota Department of Education requires candidates wishing to add the middle level endorsement for South Dakota certification to complete eight semester hours of coursework in education or pass the Praxis test in middle level education.

1.  Completion of an elementary or secondary education program.
2.  Completion of the following courses:

EDU 324

Literacy Methods in the Content Area

EDU 412

Adolescent Learners’ Needs

PSY 237

Developmental Psychology

These courses are part of the elementary and secondary education program, thus all elementary and secondary education majors are 5-8 middle level endorsed.  Candidates will need to submit passing specific content area Praxis tests to teach that subject area in a middle school.

Secondary Education Program
The secondary education program at Dakota Wesleyan University requires:

  • a specific discipline education program for 7-12 teaching (English, history, mathematics or biology);
  • completion of graduation requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree; and
  • passing scores on appropriate Praxis series exams.  This includes the content area PRAXIS test, as well as the Praxis II (7-12 Principles of Learning and Teaching) test.

To meet these requirements in four years, candidates intending to teach at the secondary level must begin the sequence of courses with EDU 201 no later than their freshman year.

Candidates must complete a 7-12 education program, including courses necessary for teacher certification in South Dakota.  All courses listed in the 7-12 education program must be taken for credit, and candidates must earn a grade of a C or higher in edu*Electivescation courses.  EDU 474 Student Teaching is taken Credit/No Credit. 

Courses necessary for completion of 7-12 education programs are listed in the discipline sections of the catalog.  Dakota Wesleyan University offers education programs that satisfy the academic requirements for secondary teacher certification by the South Dakota Department of Education.  Candidates gain certification by completing a particular program area and passing the content area Praxis exam as well as the Praxis PLT exam.

Dakota Wesleyan offers the following content programs: 

7-12

Language Arts–English Education

7-12

Mathematics Education

7-12

Biology Education

7-12

History Education

Endorsements for the Secondary Education Program
Each discipline may recommend coursework for endorsements to help candidates meet or exceed the minimum score on the Praxis exam.  Contact the department chairman of that discipline for suggestions.  The state requirements for each are listed on the South Dakota Department of Education website http://doe.sd.gov/oatq/Praxis.aspor www.ets.org/Praxis to learn more about the Praxis II examination.

Teaching endorsements are available in the following areas in conjunction with the completion of a 7-12, K-8 or K-12 education program: 

7-12

Biology

7-12

Chemistry

7-12

Earth Science

7-12

Economics

7-12

Geography

7-12

History

7-12

Language Arts–Drama/Theatre

7-12

Language Arts–English Education

7-12

Language Arts–Literature

7-12

Language Arts–Speech/Debate

7-12

Mathematics

7-12

Physical Science

7-12

Physics

7-12

Political Science

7-12

Psychology

7-12

Sociology

Candidates who have received a teaching certificate in South Dakota may choose to take and pass additional Praxis content tests in order to be endorsed in other teaching content areas.

Special Education Program
Purpose
The purpose of the special education program at Dakota Wesleyan University is to prepare educators to embrace diversity among learners.  The program is designed to increase knowledge and skills to assess needs, plan programs and monitor progress of students with exceptionalities.  The coursework in the special education major along with passing scores on the required Praxis II tests meet the South Dakota Department of Education requirements for K-12 special education certification.

Objectives
Graduates of the special education major should:

  • value and respect the rights and privileges of all individuals in the home, school and community;
  • advance society’s knowledge about individuals with disabilities;
  • prepare to be a dynamic and contributing team member within diverse educational communities;
  • recognize the need for continuous personal growth through professional organizations and the examination of current research and practice;
  • be competent in the integration of effective pedagogy for the various styles of learning and the unique needs of individuals;
  • create positive learning environments for all students in inclusive classrooms; and
  • make decisions based on the laws, policies and procedures established at local, state and federal levels.

Admission into Special Education Program
Before students may take the entry level class SPD 206, they must be admitted into the education program. Please refer to “Acceptance into the Teacher Education Program” which lists the requirements to be admitted into the program.

Special Education Program K-12
Candidates majoring in elementary education or special education will fall under the elementary education or special education catalog and handbook requirements for the year in which they receive acceptance into the education program.

The special education program at Dakota Wesleyan University requires:

  • completion of all  K-12 special education program courses. Candidates must receive a grade of a C or higher for successful completion of all the  courses listed in the program. SPD 470 is taken for Credit/No Credit;
  • completion of graduation requirements, including General Education courses and at least 126 total hours;
  • submission of passing scores on the Praxis tests before student teaching; and
  • completion of an electronic portfolio and exit interview.

Candidates pursuing a K-12 special education degree are not required to pursue a minor.

K-12 Special Education Courses

Required education courses:

EDU 201

Foundations of Education

3

EDU 216

Technology for Teachers I

1

EDU 311

Educational Psychology

3

EDU 316

Technology for Teachers II

1

EDU 324

Literacy Methods in the Content Area

3

EDU 330

Curriculum Standards and Assessment

3

EDU 335

American Indian Education

3

EDU 344

Mathematics Methods and Practicum

3

EDU 365

Classroom Management for the K-12 Educator

3

EDU 380

Evidence-Based Reading K-3

3

EDU 382

Evidence Based Reading 4-8

3

EDU 410

Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 412

Adolescent Learners’ Needs

3

EDU 416

Technology for Teachers III

1

EDU 475

Seminar

2

SPD 206

Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom

3

SPD 310

Developing and Adapting Curriculum for Individuals with Exceptionalities

3

SPD 311

Students with High Incidence Disabilities

3

SPD 312

Students with Low Incidence Disabilities

3

SPD 315

Administering Tests and Assessing Behavior of Individuals with Exceptionalities

3

SPD 320

Communication, Collaboration and Consultation and Special Education Law

3

SPD 325

Characteristics, Assessment and Management Techniques for Individuals with EBD

3

SPD 470

Student Teaching in Special Education

14

 

Total

73

Additional required courses:

BIO 101

General Biology

4

HIS 201

U.S. History I    or

 

HIS 202

U.S. History II

3

MTH 125

College Algebra

3

MTH 150

Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher

3

PHS 101

Physical Science: Chemistry, Earth and Space

3

POL 153

U.S. Government

3

PSY 237

Developmental Psychology

3

 

Electives*

3

 

Subtotal

25

*Electives

COM 210

Interpersonal Communication

3

ENG 312

Advanced Expository Writing

3

ENG 342

English Grammar

3

PSY 337

Adolescent Psychology

3

SPD 328

Special Education at the Early Childhood and Kindergarten Level

3

Additional electives available in consultation with the director of special education.

General Education support courses are listed under the five foundational pillars for the College of Leadership and Public Service. The pillars can be found in “Academic Programs.”  A grade of C or better is required for all General Education courses.

Special Education Endorsements for Teacher Certification
Three levels of endorsements:
K-12 Special Education Endorsement
7-12 Special Education Endorsement
K-8 Special Education Endorsement

A special education endorsement requires:

  1. teacher certification and one year of general classroom teaching, or special education paraprofessional experience, or special education certification and one year of special education teaching experience;
  2. the passage of the state special education teacher licensing examination; and
  3. a minimum of a three semester-hour special education practicum under the supervision of a certified special education teacher and university supervisor at each level of endorsement.

A K-8 special education endorsement requires a minimum of 26 credits with a minimum of 23 credits in special education.  The credits in special education shall include a special education practicum of three semester hours. Candidates must demonstrate thorough coursework knowledge and skills at the K-8 endorsement level to meet the Council of Exceptional Children’s performance-based standards covering: foundations, development and characteristics of learners, individual learning differences, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, communication, instructional planning, assessment, professional and ethical practice, and collaboration.

A 7-12 special education endorsement requires a minimum of 26 credits with a minimum of 23 in special education. The credits in special education shall include vocational transition and a special education practicum of three semester hours. Candidates must demonstrate thorough coursework knowledge and skills at the 7-12 endorsement level to meet the Council of Exceptional Children’s performance-based standards covering: foundations, development and characteristics of learners, individual learning differences, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, communication, instructional planning, assessment, professional and ethical practice, and collaboration.

A K-12 special education endorsement requires a minimum of 27 credits with a minimum of 24 in special education. The credits in special education shall include vocational transition and a special education practicum of two semester hours at the elementary level and two semester hours at the secondary level. Candidates must demonstrate thorough coursework knowledge and skills at the K-12 endorsement level to meet the Council of Exceptional Children’s performance-based standards covering: foundations, development and characteristics of learners, individual learning differences, instructional strategies, learning environments and social interactions, communication, instructional planning, assessment, professional and ethical practice, and collaboration.

General requirements for all three endorsement levels:  Teacher certification and three years of general classroom teaching experience or special education certification and one year of special education teaching experience.

SPD 206

Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom

3

SPD 310/510

Developing and Adapting Curriculum for Individuals with Exceptionalities

3

SPD 311/511

Students with High Incidence Disabilities

3

SPD 312/512

Students with Low Incident Disabilities

3

SPD 315/515

Administering Tests and Assessing Behavior of Individuals with Exceptionalities

3

SPD 320/520

Communication, Collaboration and Consultation and Special Education Law

3

SPD 325/525

Characteristics, Assessment and Management Techniques for Individuals with EBD

3

SPD 452/552

Special Education Practicum K-8

3

SPD 454/554

Special Education Practicum 7-12

3

SPD 456/556

Special Education Practicum K-12

4

A special education endorsement requires passing the state special education teacher licensing examination and a minimum of a three semester-hour special education practicum at the K-8 level, or the 7-12 level.  If the student is seeking a K-12 endorsement, the requirement is a four credit practicum, with two credits being completed at the elementary level and two credits completed at the secondary level. 

Course Descriptions
Education (EDU)

201 Foundations of Education 3 hours S
This course is an investigation of contemporary education in America and assists candidates in determining their career path, with a special emphasis on the tools and skills necessary to become an effective teacher.  Observation experience in a school setting is required.  This course is required for elementary education, special education and secondary education candidates and is taken as the first in the sequence of education courses.  EDU 201 is a prerequisite for all other education courses.
Prerequisites:
1.   Completion of at least three General Education courses.
2.   An accumulated GPA of at least 2.6 (no rounding up).
3.   Proof of liability insurance or DWUFTO membership.

216 Technology for Teachers I 1 hour S
This course provides a foundation for integrating technology into the classroom with instructional activities and tools. Developing a mindset for enhancing classroom instruction with technology through exploration and application is a primary goal in addition to recognizing standards, ethics and human issues related to the use of technology in the classroom. May be taken concurrently with, but not before EDU 201.

224 Children’s Literature 3 hours F
This course includes the study of a variety of genres, including multicultural literature for children. Candidates will explore ways of sharing literature and will investigate and apply effective strategies for integrating children’s literature into the general classroom. Experiential teaching in the real classroom will provide extended opportunities to develop skills.

252 Music, Movement and Art 3 hours S
This course is designed to prepare candidates to integrate art, music and movement into daily classroom instruction.  Upon completion of the coursework, all candidates will be able to successfully use music, movement and art in all subject areas and classroom settings throughout the school year. 

290/390/490 Rapid Educational Development Initiative (REDI) 1-3 hours F,S
Classroom settings will provide an environment for application for candidates showing exceptional teaching skills. Candidates will be matched with a teacher either in Mitchell or a surrounding community and will replace and connect coursework tasks with relevant real classroom episodes. Candidates may take the course each semester as an honors education program.
Prerequisites: EDU 201, application and approval of department chairman, and at least sophomore status.

299 Selected Topics – Basic 1-3 hours TBA
Prerequisite: EDU 201.

311 Educational Psychology 3 hours F
This course will examine theories of learning and how they may be applied to the classroom. It will include the study of cognitive development, motivation and learning, how knowledge is constructed and constructivism, individual differences in learning, and learning environments.
Prerequisites: EDU 201. Noneducation majors must have consent of the instructor.

316 Technology for Teachers II 1 hour S
This course continues and expands on materials introduced in EDU 216.  Candidates will construct lesson plans and present lessons integrating a variety of technology applications.   Experiential teaching in the real classroom will provide extended opportunities to develop skills.
Prerequisites:  EDU 201, EDU 216.

324 Literacy Methods in the Content Area 3 hours S
This course provides K-12 candidates with a balance of theory and application regarding the skills needed to teach reading and writing in the content areas. Candidates will investigate, develop and apply strategies using a variety of scientifically researched reading, writing, listening and speaking methods to meet the literacy needs of all students.  This course is part of the spring block experience. Courses include EDU 324, EDU 344 and EDU 365.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisites for elementary education majors: EDU 344 and EDU 365.
Corequisites for secondary education majors: EDU 365 or approval of education department chairman.

330 Curriculum Standards and Assessment 3 hours F
This course will focus on the various forms of assessment, including measurement and evaluation, and the connection to local, state and national standards in all of the disciplines.  Candidates will evaluate observed classrooms and apply strategies to meet various standards in a field experience. This course is part of the fall block experience.  Courses include EDU 330, EDU 342 and EDU 343.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisites for elementary education majors:  EDU 342 and EDU 343.
Corequisites for secondary education majors: EDU 356 or consent of the chairman of the education department.

335 American Indian Education 3 hours S
This course is designed for prospective and experienced teachers.  Candidates will learn about the rich American Indian culture in South Dakota and its impact on the education of American Indian students.  The study includes an examination of skills necessary for the effective teaching of American Indian children.  The course is designed to meet the South Dakota certification requirement in American Indian studies and is required of all teacher education candidates.  There may be out-of-town travel and additional expenses required for this class.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.  If not an education major, consent of instructor.
General Education: Cultural and Global Awareness 

342 Social Studies Methods and Practicum 3 hours F
This course is a survey of social studies education in the United States, looking at methodology and practices for students in the elementary and middle levels.  It includes organization of the social studies curriculum and available materials, and modification of the curriculum for students with unique needs.  A field experience in an elementary or middle school classroom is required.  This course is part of the fall block experience.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisites: EDU 330 and EDU 343.

343 Science Methods and Practicum 3 hours F
This course is a survey of basic scientific skills to be mastered by students at K-8 levels and an awareness of the methodologies of teaching science concepts, including modification of the curriculum for the exceptional student.  Candidates are assigned to classrooms for fieldwork.  This course is part of the fall block experience.
Prerequisites: EDU 201, BIO 101 and PHS 101.
Corequisites: EDU 330 and EDU 342.

344 Mathematics Methods and Practicum 3 hours S
This course is a survey of the contemporary mathematical process to be mastered by students at K-8 levels and an awareness of the problem-solving methodologies of teaching concepts, including modification of the curriculum for the exceptional student.  Candidates are assigned to classrooms for fieldwork. This course is part of the spring block experience.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and MTH 150.
Corequisites: EDU 324 and EDU 365.

356 Secondary and Middle Level Teaching Methods 3 hours F13
This course covers the methods of teaching secondary and middle level education, and considers all the aspects and responsibilities that come with the job, including the decision-making process, establishing a classroom climate conducive to learning, motivating students, classroom management, linking curriculum and instruction, planning the instruction, instructional techniques and methods for promoting learning.  A constructivist approach to teaching and learning is emphasized.  A field experience is required.  This course will be offered on a two-year rotation on odd-numbered years.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisites: EDU 330 or consent of the chairman of the education department.

365 Classroom Management for the K-12 Educator 3 hours S
This course will involve the study of strategies for creating successful K-12 learning communities, planning for the school year, working with families, establishing classroom rules, maintaining appropriate behavior, motivating students to learn and responding to inappropriate behaviors. Different theories of classroom management will be explored. A field experience is required.  This course is part of the spring block experience for elementary education majors. Courses include in the spring block for elementary education majors are: EDU 324, EDU 344 and EDU 365. Secondary education majors are strongly advised to take this course at the same time as EDU 324
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisites for elementary education majors: EDU 324 and EDU 344.
Corequisites for secondary education majors: EDU 324 or approval of education department chairman.

380 Evidence-Based Reading K-3 3 hours F
This course builds the K-3 teacher candidate’s knowledge of evidence-based instructional practices of the five essential components of reading acquisition specific to the K-3 level. The study includes investigation of response-to-intervention methods needed to prescribe appropriate instruction for the struggling reader.
Prerequisite:  EDU 201.

382 Evidence-Based Reading 4-8 3 hours S
This course builds K-8 candidate’s knowledge of evidence-based reading instructional practices related to students in grades 4-8An investigation of reading diagnosis and prescription provides candidates with skills needed to identify reading levels and determine appropriate interventions for the struggling reader.
Prerequisite: EDU 201

410 Human Relations/Multiculturalism 3 hours F
This course provides candidates with knowledge in the areas of multiculturalism and human relations. 
Through experiential learning, candidates will understand the impact of a changing society on education and human relations.  There may be out-of-town travel and other expenses required for this class.
Prerequisite: EDU 201 or permission of the professor if the student is not an education major.

412 Adolescent Learners’ Needs 3 hours F
The course will help prepare candidates to teach at the middle level.  The course will develop an understanding of the middle school concept and the instructional strategies that support that concept.  Field experience at the middle level will be required.
Prerequisite: EDU 201.

416 Technology for Teachers III 1 hours S
This course is the culminating experience in the technology for teachers series.  Candidates will study current technology with a focus on Web 2.0. Candidates will collaborate with a classroom teacher in order to integrate various Web 2.0 applications. Candidates will demonstrate technology skills in a formal lesson presentation. 
Prerequisite: EDU 201.
Corequisite: This class may be taken at the same time as EDU 316.
 
460 Independent Study in Education 1-3 hours F,S
Candidates can select projects for intensive study.
Prerequisite: EDU 201 and consent of instructor and chairman of the education department.

470 K-12 Student Teaching 14 hours F,S
Candidates are assigned to a school district and supervised by a certified teacher at the elementary level (K-8) and at secondary level (7-12) for 70 days (14 full weeks). The student teaching will be divided in half at each level. During this period they will fulfill obligations and responsibilities similar to those of the cooperating teacher. This course is part of the professional semester and is taken with a two-credit seminar, which is part of the 16 hours for degree candidates. Candidates also meet during the professional semester for seminar requirements. This course is offered Credit/No Credit only. The DWU Student Teacher Handbook and seminar syllabus serve as the course syllabus.
Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework required for graduation, 2.6 GPA, admission from the education department faculty, submission of passing Praxis II examination scores for the required tests and approval for student teaching placement.
Corequisite: EDU 475.

472 K-8 Student Teaching 14 hours F,S
Candidates are assigned to a school district and supervised by a certified teacher at the elementary level and/or middle school/junior high level for 70 days (14 full weeks). During this period they will fulfill obligations and responsibilities similar to those of the cooperating teacher. This course is part of the professional semester and is taken along with a two-credit seminar, which is part of the 16 hours for degree candidates. Candidates also meet during the professional semester for seminar requirements. This course is offered Credit/No Credit only. The DWU Student Teacher Handbook and seminar syllabus serve as the course syllabus.
Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework required for graduation, 2.6 GPA, admission from the education department faculty, submission of passing Praxis II examination scores for the required tests, and approval for student teaching placement.
Corequisite: EDU 475.

474 7-12 Student Teaching 14 hours F,S
Candidates are assigned to a school district and supervised by a certified teacher at the middle school/junior high level and/or at the secondary level for 70 days (14 full weeks). During this period they will fulfill obligations and responsibilities similar to those of the cooperating teacher. This course is part of the professional semester and is taken with a two-credit seminar, which is part of the 16 hours for degree candidates. Candidates also meet during the professional semester for seminar requirements. This course is offered Credit/No Credit only. The DWU Student Teacher Handbook and seminar syllabus serve as the course syllabus.
Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework required for graduation, 2.6 GPA, admission from the education department faculty and secondary discipline faculty, submission of passing scores on the required Praxis tests and approval for student teaching placement.
Corequisite: EDU 475.

475 Seminar 2 hours F,S
Candidates are required to take this seminar during their student teaching experience.  Candidates will research the following topics during this seminar: classroom climate, instructional pedagogy, assessment, resume writing and interviewing skills.  Candidates are required to complete their electronic portfolio and an action research project during the seminar.  Attendance is required in order to successfully complete the student teaching experience.  Class dates will require candidates to be on campus before the beginning of each semester.
Corequisite: EDU 470, EDU 472 or EDU 474.

499 Selected Topics – Advanced 1-3 hours TBA
Prerequisite: EDU 201.

Course Descriptions
Special Education (SPD)
206 Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom  3 hours F
This course is designed to familiarize students with requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, curriculum development and modification for inclusion of students with exceptionalities in the regular classroom, and techniques for providing a positive learning environment for all students, regardless of ability level. Areas of exceptionalities studied include: physical impairments, impaired sensory or motor functions, health impairments, learning disabilities, cognitive disabilities, giftedness, and behavioral or emotional disabilities. This class examines major trends and issues in special education, with emphasis on collaboration and inclusion, service delivery models, roles of general and special class teachers, individual education programs, and family and community involvement. This course addresses the needs of the individual with exceptionalities from birth through adulthood.
Prerequisite: EDU 201

300 Field Experience in Special Education 1-3 hours TBA
This course provides practical experiences in classroom settings so students may become familiar with teaching strategies, instructional models and classroom management systems.  It is required concurrently with the methods course in the teaching major.  Required classroom hours: 45 hours for each semester credit hour.
Prerequisite: EDU 201 and SPD 206.

310/510 Developing and Adapting Curriculum 3 hours F13
for Individuals with Exceptionalities                                                    
This course addresses instructional strategies, materials and assistive technology devices needed to provide a positive learning environment for students with disabilities. Future special and general educators enrolled in this course will develop, implement and evaluate curricular adaptations, including accommodations and modifications, for students with disabilities. Students will demonstrate ability to select, adapt and use both commercial and teacher-made media and instructional materials, and evaluate and adapt the learning environment to provide students with disabilities an appropriate education in the least restrictive environment.
Prerequisites: EDU 201, SPD 206 or instructor permission.

311/511 Students with High Incidence Disabilities3 hours S13
This course serves as an overview of the characteristics of students with high-incidence disabilities, their learning needs, and current issues related to their education. The historic foundations, legal considerations, related causal factors and theoretical approaches that apply to the study of mild disability will be addressed. Key issues concerning meeting the needs of all students, including identification and assessment, the development of the Individualized Education Plan (IEP), use of evidence-based instruction, and transition of the student from school to adult life, will be presented. Candidates will be given an opportunity to learn from practicing special education teachers and observe and work with children with high-prevalence disabilities.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206.

312/512 Students with Low Incidence Disabilities 3 hours S13
This course serves as an introduction to, and a detailed investigation of, educational, sociological, functional and vocational concerns of people with low incidence moderate and severe disabilities. Students will review the history of low-incidence disabilities, learn to determine individual abilities, plan appropriate curriculum and deliver optimal instruction for children and young adults with moderate and severe physical and cognitive disabilities. Topics presented will include historical, legal and health issues; working with families; collaborating with team members; and supporting transition from school to community life.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206.

315/515 Administering Tests and Assessing Behavior 3 hours S14
of Individuals with Exceptionalities
This course addresses screening, assessment and evaluation of individuals with disabilities from birth through age 21. Candidates will develop, select, administer and interpret both formal and informal instruments and strategies used to determine the level of individual student performance in academic, cognitive, communicative, social, emotional, behavioral, psychomotor, prevocational/vocational and functional skills areas. Candidates will practice using assessment data and other information to determine whether an individual has a disability and requires special education or related services and also to develop appropriate individual education plans. Standards of ethics and protocol for observation and assessment will be integrated throughout this course. 
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206.      

320/520 Communication, Collaboration and Consultation 3 hours F12
and Special Education Law 
Candidates will focus on the communication skills necessary to work collaboratively and consult effectively about the special needs of students as a member of a multidisciplinary team that includes parents, administrators, teachers and agency personnel. They will be familiar with effective team processes, including roles and responsibilities of required members. The importance of the parent/family and professional partnership will be emphasized. This course encompasses a life-span perspective, requiring candidates to be knowledgeable of the early intervention service system, rehabilitation service system, and other community and interagency systems, as well as transition planning. Candidates will examine historic and current federal and state special education laws, due process, data privacy requirements and exclusionary rules, as well as the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, significant litigation and the impact of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 on students with special needs.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206 or permission of instructor.

325/525 Characteristics, Assessment and Management 3 hours S14
Techniques for Individuals with EBD
This course focuses on developing and designing positive behavioral and social/emotional interventions, strategies and supports that represent current and best practices for individual and whole classroom management. Candidates will familiarize themselves with the etiology and characteristics of individuals with behavioral and/or emotional challenges. Candidates will also acquire and practice techniques for effective observation and assessment of students with behavioral challenges and develop the skills necessary to design and implement, with other multidisciplinary team members, student behavior management programs. Focus will be on creating classrooms where learning is optimized through peaceful, respectful interactions between students and teachers, as well as among students.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206.

328 Special Education at the Early Childhood and Kindergarten Level 3 hours TBA
This course will focus on effective strategies of instruction, intervention and curricular approaches to use in meeting the needs of preschool- and kindergarten-aged children with exceptional learning needs.  Candidates will learn to integrate the best practices of early childhood education with the best practices of special education.  Developmentally appropriate practice recommended by the leading professional organizations in the fields of early childhood education and special education will serve as guidelines for this course.
Prerequisites: EDU 201.

450/550 Early Childhood and Special Education Practicum 2-4 hours TBA
Candidates completing the special education birth through preschool endorsement are assigned to an early childhood special education setting and supervised by a certified early childhood special education teacher.  Required classroom hours: 45 hours for each semester credit hour.
Prerequisites: EDU 201 and SPD 206.

452/552 Special Education Practicum K-8 2-4 hours TBA
Students completing the special education K-8 endorsement are assigned to a secondary school setting and supervised by a certified special education teacher. Required classroom hours: 45 hours for each semester hour.  The state of South Dakota requires a grade of at least a C to pass.

454/554 Special Education Practicum 7-12 2-4 hours TBA
Students completing the special education 7-12 endorsement are assigned to a secondary school setting and supervised by a certified special education teacher. Required classroom hours: 45 hours for each semester hour. The state of South Dakota requires a grade of at least a C to pass.

456/556 Special Education Practicum K-12 4 hours TBA
Students completing the special education K-12 endorsement are assigned to an elementary school setting and a secondary school setting, and supervised by a certified special education teacher at each level. The state of South Dakota requires two credits of the practicum be completed at the elementary level and two credits completed at the secondary level. Required classroom hours: 45 hours for each semester credit hour. The state of South Dakota requires a grade of at least a C to pass.

470 Student Teaching in Special Education 14 hours F,S
Candidates will student teach for 70 school days, under the supervision of a certified special education teacher.  The student teacher will be assigned to an elementary placement for 35 days and secondary placement for 35 days.  This course is part of the professional semester and is taken with a two-credit seminar, which is part of the 16 hours for degree candidates.  Candidates also meet during the professional semester for seminar requirements.  This course is offered Credit/No Credit only.  The DWU Student Teacher Handbook and seminar syllabus serve as the course syllabus.
Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework required for graduation, 2.6 GPA submission of passing scores on required Praxis tests, admission from the education department faculty and approval for student teaching placement.


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