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History
College of Arts and Humanities

History Home Page

History (HIS)
History seeks to understand how people lived in the past and how their experiences and institutions shaped their world and our own.  History is also a way of thinking; by reflecting on the past and exploring historical problems, we deepen our understanding of the human condition.  DWU history majors raise historical questions, examine historical documents and share their ideas with peers and the larger community.  As an intellectual discipline, history teaches us to read critically, think analytically, communicate effectively and examine issues of learning, leadership, faith and service.

Major

HIS 101

World History I

3

HIS 102

World History II

3

HIS 201

U.S. History I

3

HIS 202

U.S. History II

3

HIS 401

Historical Research and Writing

3

HIS

Electives (at least 12 hours upper level)

15

 

Total

30

Students in the College of Arts and Humanities must pass two semesters of foreign language. 

History Education
Students interested in teacher certification in history must complete the following program.  For further clarification, see “Education,” speak to your adviser or speak to the education department chairman.

Required history courses:

HIS 101

World History I

3

HIS 102

World History II

3

HIS 201

U.S. History I

3

HIS 202

U.S. History II

3

HIS 330

History of South Dakota

3

HIS 360

Middle and Secondary History Teaching Methods

3

HIS 401

Historical Research and Writing

3

HIS

Electives (at least nine hours upper level)

12

 

Total

33


Additional required courses:

EDU 201

Foundations of Education

3

EDU 216

Technology for Teachers I

1

EDU 311

Educational Psychology

3

EDU 316

Technology for Teachers II

1

EDU 324

Literacy Methods in the Content Area

3

EDU 330

Curriculum Standards and Assessment

3

EDU 335

American Indian Education

3

EDU 356

Secondary and Middle Level Teaching Methods

3

EDU 365

Classroom Management for the K-12 Educator

3

EDU 410

Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 412

Adolescent Learners’ Needs

3

EDU 416

Technology for Teachers III

1

EDU 474

7-12 Student Teaching

14

EDU 475

Seminar

2

PSY 237

Developmental Psychology

3

SPD 206

Teaching Students with Exceptionalities in the General Classroom

3

 

Total

52

American Studies Program
The American studies program offers an interdisciplinary major or minor for students who wish to study outside the box and pursue a customized degree program.  See “American Studies.”

Minor
History

HIS 101

World History I

3

HIS 102

World History II

3

HIS 201

U.S. History I or

 

HIS 202

U.S. History II

3

HIS

Electives (at least six hours upper level)

9

 

Total

18

Pre-law
The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) does not prescribe certain courses or extracurricular activities for students planning to study law, because of the wide range of relevant pre-law preparation.  Law schools seek in their students accomplishment in understanding, the capacity to think for themselves and the ability to express their thoughts with clarity and force.

When applying this philosophy to specific course areas, the AALS includes the following disciplines and comments.  This list is not meant to exclude other areas.

Communications, English, speech and languages – “The lawyer must be able to communicate effectively in oral and written expression.  The formal role of the lawyer – in court, legislature and administrative agency – and the informal roles of counselor and negotiator demand the highest skills of expression.”

History – “History study allows the thoughtful organization of human experience so as to assist understanding … Law students often encounter concepts that are intelligible only in terms of their historical roots.”

Philosophy “A sensitivity to the enduring questions of personal and public morality forms an appropriate backdrop for the consideration of legal issues.  Perhaps of even greater importance is the training in understanding transactions.”

Logic, mathematics and legal decisions – “These disciplines emphasize the power of inference.  They do not, however, supply the plasticity and ambiguity of fact and theory that make legal inference a different experience.  For this, only the richness of verbal symbols, found in every corner of the curriculum, provides analogies.”

Economics – “Significant numbers of legal questions ultimately involve economic issues ... The use of symbols and systems in economics can be especially valuable to prospective lawyers.”

Social Sciences: political science, sociology, psychology, anthropology, economics – “The interaction of law and social science is something with which the law student will want more than passing familiarity ... Law is a social science.”

Science and engineering – “The traditional vigor of the training provided and the precision demanded in these fields guarantee that these students will have engaged in critical thinking before arrival at law school.  However, students with science concentrations should be sure to select courses that will expose them to the broad range of skills, particularly communication skills, that are essential ingredients in law study.”

Accounting – “Prospective law students would be wise to learn basic accounting in college and certainly should be required to master at least its rudiments in law school.”

Computer science – “One can do very well in law school with no knowledge of computers but this knowledge will affect legal work and research increasingly.  The law student who has some understanding of this technology will be better equipped for legal work in the future.”

The General Education program at DWU emphasizes many of the disciplines and skills that the AALS considers desirable for prospective law students.  When considering majors and minors, desirable areas of emphasis appear to be communications, history, political science and economics.

Nearly all schools of law in the United States require applicants to take a standardized Law School Admission Test.  This test is administered on several specific dates each year.

Students interested in law as a profession should contact the pre-law adviser for counsel.

Course Descriptions
101 World History I 3 hours F
This course is the first half of a general survey of the development of civilizations from ancient times to the present, including discussion of the nature of history, the political and cultural advancement of civilizations and their interactions.  HIS 101 covers the time period to approximately 1600 A.D.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Historical Thinking and Analysis

102 World History II 3 hours S
This course is the second half of a general survey of the development of civilizations from ancient times to the present, including discussion of the nature of history, the political and cultural advancement of civilizations and their interactions.  HIS 102 covers the time period since approximately 1600 A.D.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Historical Thinking and Analysis

201 U.S. History I 3 hours F
This course is the first half of a study of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present.  Special emphasis is given to problem-solving techniques using historical case studies.  HIS 201 covers the time period to approximately 1877.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Historical Thinking and Analysis

202 U.S. History II 3 hours S
This course is the second half of a study of U.S. history from the colonial period to the present.  HIS 202 covers the time period since approximately 1877.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Historical Thinking and Analysis

275 Field Experience 1-2 hours TBA

299 Selected Topics – Basic 1-3 hours TBA

301 American Colonial History 3 hours F12
This course comparatively explores the colonial experience in North America.  The colonial histories of the Spanish, French, British, Dutch and Russians will be examined.  The course will focus on the political, social, economic and cultural interactions of American Indians, Europeans and Africans.  Students will gain a greater appreciation and understanding of America’s diverse colonial roots.

302 America Since 1945 3 hours S13
This course examines the historical evolution of the modern United States.  Students will explore the political, social, economic and cultural history of the United States from 1945 to the present.  Themes of special consideration include the growth of government, major social reform movements, and the domestic impacts of international conflict and global change.
General Education: Critical and Collaborative Thinking – Historical Thinking and Analysis

304 History of American Sports 3 hours F13
This course will explore the evolution of American sports from the colonial period to the present with an emphasis on the 20th and 21st centuries.  Particular attention will be paid to athletes and events that define the American sports experience.

310 History of the British Empire 3 hours F13
This course explores the origins, rise and fall of the British Empire, covering nearly the entire globe from the 16th century into the 20th century.  The course examines the political, social, economic and cultural dimensions of the British imperial experience.  The history of British imperialism will be considered from the perspective of the colonizer and the colonized and in ways that improve our understanding of the modern world.

311 Europe Since World War I 3 hours S14
This course explores political, economic and social developments in 20th-century Europe.  Major topics will include World War I, the Russian Revolution, fascism and authoritarianism, World War II, the Cold War, and the European Union.

313 Latin American History 3 hours S13
This course surveys the political, social, economic and cultural history of Latin America from precolonial times to the present.  It examines Latin America’s indigenous foundations, colonial experience, independence movements, 19th-century nation building and national developments in the 20th century.  The course will also address the historical relationship between the United States and Latin American nations.

330 History of South Dakota 3 hours F13
This course is a survey of the history of South Dakota.  Topics include geography, early explorations, American Indian life, and the political, economic and cultural developments after white settlement. HIS 330 is required for all history education majors.

339 American Indian History to 1890 3 hours F12
This course surveys the history and culture of American Indians up to 1890. The course begins with an examination of the diverse peoples of native America before European contact and concludes with the military and cultural conflicts between western American Indian nations and the United States.  The course will focus on the history of American Indian nations and their experiences and relationships with the United States during this period.

340 American Indian History Since 1890 3 hours S13
This course surveys the history and culture of American Indians since the 1880s. The course begins with an examination of American Indian responses to the assimilationist programs of the United States government in the late 19th century and concludes with an exploration of contemporary issues facing American Indians today.  The course will focus on the history of American Indian nations and their experiences and relationships with the United States during this period.

351 American Foreign Policy 3 hours F13
(Refer to POL 351)

360 Middle and Secondary History Teaching Methods 3 hours S13
This course is a survey of history teaching standards and methods at the middle and secondary levels.  Although the course will address state and national standards in social studies and provide some brief introductions to other social studies disciplines, it will largely focus on the theories and methods of teaching history at the middle and secondary levels.  The course is a required course for all History Education majors. 
Prerequisites: HIS 101, HIS 102, HIS 201, HIS 202, EDU 201 and EDU 356 or consent of the instructor and the chairman. 

382 World War I 3 hours F12
Students will examine the origins, course and legacy of World War I.  Lectures and discussions will be supplemented by film viewings and readings from DWU’s World War I documents website.

383 World War II 3 hours S13
Students will examine the origins, course and legacy of World War II with attention paid to both the European and Pacific theaters.  Lectures and discussions will be complemented by documentary and film viewing.

384 The Korean and Vietnam Wars 3 hours S14
This class explores the origins, course and legacy of America’s involvement in the two hot wars of the Cold War era.  The class is team-taught with a former Army officer who served in Vietnam.

386 Asian History 3 hours S14
This course is a survey of Asian history from ancient times to the present with an emphasis on China, India and Japan.  Students will explore cross-cultural currents and the countries’ institutional and social evolutions.  Studies of Asian religions, dynastic change, imperial growth and nationalism serve as frameworks for assessing modern historical problems.

401 Historical Research and Writing 3 hours S
In this capstone course, students will practice the art and craft of historical writing.  A research project is required.  Required for all history majors and for students who plan to teach.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor. 

450 Practicum or Internship 1-3 hours F,S
Students may develop internships in consultation with the instructor in such areas as museums, historical societies and archives.

460 Independent Study 1-3 hours F,S
On an individual basis, students may arrange research with the instructor.  The instructor must approve the topics for study.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and a history major/minor or consent of instructor.

499 Selected Topics – Advanced 1-3 hours F,S
The department of history routinely offers these courses in response to student interests and to provide historical perspective on contemporary issues. 


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