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Master of Arts - Education
College of Leadership and Public Service

Teacher Certification

Education with Concentrations in:

  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Pre K-12 Principal Certification and Degree
  • Secondary Certification and Degree
  • Educational Policy and Administration
  • History Curriculum and Instruction

The Master of Arts program is designed to serve the region’s educational communities.  Students complete the required coursework credit hours and a capstone.  For their capstone, students may choose to write a research thesis and defend it, take a comprehensive examination, or prepare a rigorous proposal.  The DWU Master of Arts is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Accreditation Association and is affirmed by the South Dakota Department of Education.

An undergraduate cumulative GPA of a 2.7 meets minimum acceptance standards.  Applicants who are below that minimum may be denied admission.  An appeal process is in place in which a written appeal should be sent to the office of admissions within a reasonable amount of time for review by the Graduate Studies Committee.

The program objectives are to:

  1. amplify and refresh instructional pedagogy of area educators, which will reinvigorate area school environments;

  2. provide a setting for professional growth for area educators; and

  3. encourage exploration of contemporary instructional practice and investigate application of identified practices.

Accepted students may register at any time to begin a program of study.  Students should refer to the DWU Graduate Program Handbook, which is available online and in the graduate studies office.

Graduation Requirements
The Master of Arts degree is conferred upon students who:

  1. maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0:
  2. receive a minimum course grade for courses accepted toward a graduate degree of a C or better.  Grades of less than a C are not considered toward degree completion but are counted in the cumulative GPA.  All courses may be repeated once for credit if a C- or less is received.  Students wishing to repeat a course with a C or better must receive permission from the dean to repeat the course:
  3. complete all required coursework for a program degree within four years of admission to that program.  A student may be granted a one-year extension for completion of a degree upon request and with approval of the dean and the program committee; and
  4. successfully complete one or more concentrations.

Students may participate in the commencement ceremony if they are registered for summer classes, are within nine hours of degree completion and have applied for graduation.

Additional Concentrations
Graduate students in the Master of Arts in education program may earn additional concentrations by completing all core requirements in the chosen areas. Students must meet with the director of graduate studies to apply for an additional concentration.  Students may be allowed to use credit hours in one program concentration toward a second program concentration within a degree, provided they complete all courses in both concentrations and complete an additional 12 mutually exclusive graduate hours for the second concentration. 

Graduate students in the Master of Arts program have five concentrations from which to choose.

Curriculum and Instruction
This program requires a minimum of 36 coursework credit hours and a capstone. For their capstone, students may choose to write a research thesis and defend it, take a comprehensive examination, or prepare a rigorous proposal.  This degree is an enhancement of previous study. It is not a degree leading to certification or administration.

Professional Opportunities
The curriculum and instruction program does not have an administrative focus and is not intended for individuals seeking administrative positions.  However, the accreditation and focus of the program will enable graduates to seek higher levels of either future postgraduate work or positions requiring an in-depth background in instructional methodology.

Core Curriculum for Curriculum and Instruction

EDU 610

Advanced Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 701

Technology Instruction and Design

3

EDU 761

Education in a Culture of Change

3

EDU 765

Curriculum and Teaching Methods

3

EDU 770

Advanced Educational Psychology

3

EDU 771

Current Trends in Assessment and Evaluation

3

EDU 775

Educational Leadership

3

EDU 779

Pre K-12 School Finance

3

EDU 790

Research Methodology

3

SPD 701

The Diverse Classroom

3

EDU

Electives (selected in consultation with adviser)

6

 

Total

36

Pre K-12 Principal Certification and Degree
This program requires a minimum of 36 coursework credit hours, a capstone and two pre K-12 internships. For their capstone students may choose to write a research thesis and defend it, take a comprehensive examination, or prepare a rigorous proposal.

Prerequisite: Students should have a bachelor’s degree in an education field.

Professional Opportunities
Completion of this South Dakota administration certification program and three years of teaching experience qualifies students for pre K-12 principal positions.

Core Curriculum for Pre K-12 Principal Certification and Degree


EDU 701

Technology Instruction and Design

3

EDU 761

Education in a Culture of Change

3

EDU 765

Curriculum and Teaching Methods

3

EDU 771

Current Trends in Assessment and Evaluation

3

EDU 772

Education Law

3

EDU 773

Professional Development in Schools

3

EDU 775

Educational Leadership

3

EDU 779

Pre K-12 School Finance

3

EDU 790

Research Methodology

3

EDU 797

Administrative Internship – Elementary

3

EDU 798

Administrative Internship – Secondary

3

SPD 701

The Diverse Classroom

3

 

Total

36

Secondary Certification and Degree
This program requires a minimum of 36 coursework credit hours, student teaching and a capstone. For their capstone, students may choose to write a research thesis and defend it, take a comprehensive examination or prepare a rigorous proposal.

Prerequisite: The secondary certification and degree program requires the applicant to pass the state certification content-specific Praxis II test before acceptance can be granted into the teacher education program.  A criminal background check is also required.

In this concentration the student is responsible for the following extra costs:

  • PRAXIS test registration (approximately $50)
  • PRAXIS II (approximately $80)
  • PRAXIS PLT (approximately $80)
  • Vericheck done before student observations (approximately $50)
  • Join FTO or show verification of liability insurance (approximately $33)
  • Fingerprinting done at the Sheriff’s Office (approximately $10)
  • DCI-FBI criminal background check (approximately $50)
  • TB test

Professional Opportunities
The secondary certification and degree program is designed for students with a bachelor’s degree who wish to go into the teaching field.  Upon completion of this program and passage of the Praxis II content and Praxis PLT tests, graduates can become certified 7-12 teachers in South Dakota. 

Core Curriculum for Secondary Certification and Degree


EDU 610

Advanced Human Relations/Multiculturalism

3

EDU 612

Adolescents and Middle Level Methods

3

EDU 635

American Indian History and Culture

3

EDU 671

Student Teaching Seminar

1

EDU 701

Technology Instruction and Design

3

EDU 761

Education in a Culture of Change

3

EDU 765

Curriculum and Teaching Methods

3

EDU 770

Advanced Educational Psychology

3

EDU 771

Current Trends in Assessment and Evaluation

3

EDU 790

Research Methodology

3

EDU 796

Student Teaching 7-12

5

SPD 701

The Diverse Classroom

3

 

Total

36

Educational Policy and Administration
This program requires a minimum of 36 coursework credit hours and a capstone. For their capstone, students may choose to write a research thesis and defend it, take a comprehensive examination or prepare a rigorous proposal.

Professional Opportunities
Students completing this program will be well positioned to become midlevel administrators in higher education institutions.  Depending on their undergraduate degree, these positions could include coaching at the college level, teaching at some institutions and positions in college administration. 

Core Curriculum for Educational Policy and Administration


EDU 705

Technology and Distance Education Theory

3

EDU 750

Foundations of Higher Education

3

EDU 751

Assessment and Planning

3

EDU 752

Higher Education Finance

3

EDU 753

Organization and Governance

3

EDU 754

Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom

3

EDU 756

Public Policy Issues in Higher Education

3

EDU 757

College and University Curriculum

3

EDU 790

Research Methodology

3

EDU

Electives (selected in consultation with adviser)

9

 

Total

36

Master of Arts in Education with a Concentration in History Instruction
The Mid-central Educational Cooperative has partnered with Dakota Wesleyan University to provide a Master of Arts in education with a concentration in history instruction. The program requires all participants to be a secondary level teacher in American history or to anticipate teaching American history in the near future.

The program is designed to orient teachers with both primary and secondary texts beginning with the revolutionary period through contemporary events.  Nationally recognized faculty from the Organization of American History will teach the courses in addition to local historians and educators.  Each course has specific assignments related to educational curriculum and pedagogy in the history content area. 

The program is offered in a hybrid format with both online and in-class instruction offered.  As well, students will have an opportunity to participate in travel courses to visit prominent historic settings.  Students will be required to submit comprehensive papers, lesson plans and take a final comprehensive exam to complete the degree requirements. 

The Master of Arts degree is conferred upon students who maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, successfully complete a minimum of 30 coursework credit hours, pass a comprehensive exam, and develop an electronic portfolio consisting of an accumulation of coursework.

Core Curriculum


EDU 621

Teaching the U.S. Constitution: The Founders: 1609-1800

3

EDU 622

Teaching the U.S. Constitution: Founding Era: 1609-1800

3

EDU 623

Teaching Constitutional Issues in Early Republic, 1801-1837

3

EDU 624

Teaching Slavery and the Constitution, 1838-1861

3

EDU 625

Teaching the Constitution and Civil War,1861-1865

3

EDU 627

Teaching the Industrial State,1865-1920

3

EDU 629

Teaching the Depression and the New Deal,1920-1945

3

EDU 630

Teaching Equality in the Modern Era,1945-2000

3

EDU 631

Civil Rights Movement in the 7-12 Classroom

3

EDU 632

Living History in the 7-12 Classroom

3

 

Total

30

Course Descriptions
Education (EDU)
532 Teaching English Language Learners in the General Education Classroom            3 hours
Students will develop the knowledge and skills needed to teach English language learners (ELL).  During this course, participants will learn scientifically based strategies to improve the quality of instruction for the ELL.  In addition, the participant will learn practical information about acknowledging the diversity of the ELL population of students including social and emotional needs.  The tone of this course is directed toward compassion and academic rigor for the ELL student within the regular classroom environment.
Prerequisite:  EDU 201.

610 Advanced Human Relations/Multiculturalism                                    3 hours
This course offers an in-depth approach to providing an understanding of cultural backgrounds and the influences of dehumanizing biases such as racism, sexism and classism on the lives of students. Some field study is required.  There is a specific focus on South Dakota strands for human understanding as delineated by the South Dakota Department of Education.

612 Adolescents and Middle Level Methods                                            3 hours
The course will help prepare the educator to teach at the middle level. The course will develop an understanding of the middle school concept and the instructional strategies that support that concept. Field experience is required.

621 Teaching the U.S. Constitution: The Founders, 1609-1800                3 hours                      
Through a review of selected biographies of the founders, including the actual (Washington, Franklin, Adams, Madison, etc.) and the philosophical (Locke, Paine, etc.) founders, as well as reviews of primary source documents (the U.S. Constitution, Adams’ “The Rights of the Colonists,” Burke’s “Conciliation with America,” Henry’s “give me liberty or give me death” speech, Smith’s “The Advantages of Union with England,” etc.), and the reading of a portion of Linda Monk’s “The Words We Live By,”the students will more fully understand the people who founded America and its guiding document, the Constitution.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

622 Teaching the U.S. Constitution: Founding Era, 1609-1800                3 hours                      
Through a review of selected historical works on the founding era (Morgan’s “American Slavery,”” American Freedom,” etc.) , as well as reviews of primary source documents (Smith’s “Starving Time in Virginia,” Cotton’s “The Divine Right to Occupy the Land,” Virginia Slave Laws, Franklin’s “Albany Plan of Union, ,”The Articles of Confederation, “ “The Federalist Papers, ” etc.) and the reading of a portion of Linda Monk’s “The Words We Live By,” the students will more fully understand the philosophical milieu and the cultural issues, economic and political realities, of the founding era, including, specifically, the colonists’ motivation for founding the colonies, the introduction of slavery (from the beginning to its inclusion in the Constitution, leading to the country’s greatest constitutional crisis) early representative bodies, early religious toleration, salutary neglect, and the expectation of liberty, British civil guarantees, individual vs. virtual representation, the Great Awakening, the Enlightenment, the Articles of Confederation, the Northwest Ordinance and the addition of new states, the Hamilton-Jefferson disputes about the vision for the country, the precedents of George Washington, the Washington, D.C., controversy, the Alien and Sedition Acts, and the Revolution of 1800.   The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during summer session, and submitted papers on reading assignments. Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.
                                                      
623 Teaching Constitution Issues in Early Republic, 1801-1837              3 hours                      
Through a review of selected historical works on the era of early republic, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Linda Monk’s “The Words We Live By,” the students will more fully understand the historical events of the early republic, including the implementation and interpretation of the Constitution, including such specific issues a the early Supreme Court under Jay and Marshall, the beginnings of judicial review, the Louisiana Purchase, early American nationalism, the Jackson Administration, the rise of commerce, the national bank controversy, the extension of the franchise, the extraordinary career of Henry Clay, the end of the foreign slave trade,  and the early understanding of and evolution of state vs. national rights. The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments. Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

624 Teaching Slavery and the Constitution, 1838-1861                            3 hours                      
Through a review of selected historical works on the era culminating in the Civil War, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Linda Monk’s “The Words We Live By,”the students will more fully understand the historical events of this era of national growth, compromise and wrestling with the meaning of the Constitution, including the various legislative attempts to satisfy both abolitionists and slaveholders under one national government, the growth of the abolition and states’ rights movements, shifting political parties, the Mexican War, the Second Great Awakening, early women’s rights and abolition, the Taney Court, and the Missouri Compromise.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

625 Teaching the Constitution and Civil War, 1861-1865                         3 hours
Through a review of selected historical works on the Civil War era, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Akhil Amar’s “America’s Constitution,” the students will more fully understand the historical events of this era of war mobilization, carnage and occupation, including the changing war goals, the Emancipation Proclamation, the draft and its social implications, threatened foreign intervention,  and the changing nature of states’ rights.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

626 Teaching Reconstruction and the Constitution, 1865-1876                3 hours
Through a review of selected historical works on the Civil War era, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Akhil Amar’s “America’s Constitution,” the students will more fully understand the historical events of this era of healing, reconstruction and presidential politics, the resurgence of immigration, the conflict between the Radical Republicans and President Johnson,  the reassertion of White supremacist notions the South, Plessy vs. Ferguson,  and the Civil War Amendments.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

627 Teaching the Industrial State, 1865-1920                                           3 hours
Through a review of selected historical works on the Gilded Age, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Akhil Amar’s “America’s Constitution,” the students will more fully understand the historical events of this time of the urbanization of America, changing immigration and nativism,  the consolidation of economic power in corporations, the apex of American industrialization,  the struggles of organized labor and the response to the swings of the business cycle.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

628 Teaching the Progressive Age, 1880-1920                                         3 hours
Through a review of selected historical works on the rise of the progressives, as well as readings in primary source documents and the reading of Akhil Amar’s “America’s Constitution,” the students will more fully understand the historical events of this time of the application of scientific principles to social issues of the day, the anti-democratic slant of that application, the rise of the women’s movement especially as it related to suffrage, the response of the political parties to progressives, the battle over Prohibition, and America’s participation in the Great War.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

629 Teaching the Depression and the New Deal, 1920-1945                     3 hours
Through a review of selected historical works on the “return to normalcy” through World War II, as well as readings in primary source documents, the students will more fully understand the historical events of this time of laissez faire, Hoover’s response to the Great Depression, FDR’s New Deal and the reinvigoration of the American economy resulting from World War II, the violation of some civil liberties during the war, the boost to organized labor from the New Deal, and a new acceptance of internationalism. The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

630 Teaching Equality in the Modern Era, 1945-2000                               3 hours
Through a review of selected historical  works on the postwar years through 2000, as well as readings in primary source documents, the students will more fully understand the historical events of the postwar years, the Cold War and its affect on constitutional liberties, the rise or reassertion of conservatism in American politics, and the decisions of a robust judiciary.  The course will be taught through a combination of book/primary source discussions via distance learning, on-site speakers from the Organization of American Historians as guest lecturers during two, day-long lectures/discussions, and submitted papers on reading assignments.  Significant time and attention will also be given to optimal pedagogies for teaching American history, including technology integration.

631 Civil Rights Movement in the 7-12 Classroom                                  3 hours
This course will be taught through class visits to important locations in the history of the black civil rights movement.  Participants will travel to Alabama and Georgia to retrace the steps of the foot soldiers of the Alabama civil rights marchers and look more closely at the life and experiences of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Atlanta.  Students enrolled in this course are required to produce three civil rights lesson plans suitable for presentation to their students.  All participants are current, active teachers of American history at the middle or high school level.  The purpose of the lesson plan is to demonstrate how three different historic sites teach American history.  Lesson plans must incorporate numerous photographs from the sites themselves, which in turn will be used as teaching devices in lectures, discussions, individual and group projects, and/or student presentations.  Lesson plans should also incorporate brochures, primary sources, and historical websites that are supportive of the lesson topic or theme.

632 Living History in the 7-12 Classroom                                               3 hours
This course will be taught through class visits to important historical locations in Seneca Falls (Woman’s Suffrage Movement), Lexington, Concord (Revolutionary War), Boston (Freedom Trail), Lowell (Industrial Revolution), new York City (Ellis Island, East Side Tenement Museum, Brooklyn Bridge), Philadelphia (Independence Hall, Carpenter’s Hall, Liberty Bell, President’s House, Constitution Center, Franklin’s Court, Dolley Todd’s home, Congress Hall, and Second Bank Portrait Gallery), King of Prussia (Valley Forge), Gettysburg (Civil War battlefield), Washington, D.C. (National Portrait Gallery, Arlington Cemetery, national archive, Mount Vernon, White House, Capitol Building), Harper’s Ferry, Antietam, and Shanksville (Civil War battlefields).  Students enrolled in this course are required to produce three “living history” lesson plans suitable for presentation to their students.  All participants are current, active teachers of American history at the middle or high school level.  The purpose of the lesson plan is to demonstrate how three different historic sites ‘teach’ American history.  Lesson plans must incorporate numerous photographs from the sites themselves, which in turn will be used as teaching devices in lectures, discussions, individual and group projects, and/or student presentations.  The lesson plan should also incorporate brochures, pamphlets and historic site websites that are supportive of the lesson topic or theme. 

635 American Indian History and Culture                                               3 hours
This course, designed for prospective and experienced teachers, introduces the concept and methodology of bicultural education and its relationship to American Indian education.  Students will discuss a variety of skills and information necessary for success in working with culturally different children.  The course is designed to meet the South Dakota certification requirement in American Indian studies.  

671 Student Teacher Seminar                                                                  1 hour
Candidates will research the following topics: classroom climate, instructional pedagogy, assessment, resume writing and interviewing skills; and they will also complete their electronic portfolio during the seminar.   Attendance is required in order to successfully complete the student-teaching experience.  Class dates will require candidates to be on campus before the beginning of each semester.
Prerequisite: Consent of department chairman.

688 Literacy for All Students                                                                  3 hours
This course includes a review of content-specific literature and diagnostic and prescriptive methods of instructing comprehension and retentive behaviors for secondary students. It also includes an in-depth study or pragmatic pedagogy for improved reading ability. Field experience is required.

699 Workshop in Education                                                                1-3 hours
Graduate level workshops are offered in a variety of areas of educational interest.

701 Technology Instruction and Design                                                 3 hours
This course offers integration of most current technological advances with appropriate instructional strategy.  There is a special emphasis on technology as an accommodation for students and an organizational tool for teachers.  A professional electronic portfolio will be developed and initiated.

705 Technology and Distance Education Theory                                    3 hours
This course addresses the design of the content of learning, the academic services to support distance learning, a learner’s personal set of learning tools, and the evaluation and assessment of learning programs.  Students present issues relevant to distance education and higher education faculty and offers insights and practical advice on how to meet the diverse needs of students in the distance education setting.

750 Foundations of Higher Education                                                   3 hours
This course covers the scope of higher education in American society; introduces students to the scope of higher education in America and the world; considers the diverse array of people that make up today’s student body and faculty; looks at the modes by which the activities of the faculty and students are carried out; and explores the support system that allows the faculty and student affairs personnel to conduct their work.

751 Assessment and Planning                                                                3 hours
This course covers the basic principles of assessment and planning strategies for educators, planners and decision makers in higher education organizations.  Specifically, the course will examine conceptual and practical assessment issues relating to administration and institutional performance, teaching and learning, student performance and outcomes and measurement issues.

752 Higher Education Finance                                                               3 hours
This course provides an introduction to finance in higher education settings, including the economics and financing of higher education, government financing, institutional resources and expenditures, strategic planning and resource allocations, institutional financial management, and ethics in higher education finance.  Readings provide a broad spectrum of information and perspectives and cover a wide range of topics in terms of content as well as time period.

753 Organization and Governance                                                         3 hours
This course examines the study and practice of higher education.  Topics include classic organizational theory, traditional administrative and governance models, campus climate and culture, leadership analysis, management principles, institutional change and assessment, perspectives on race and gender, and critical approaches to organizational governance.

754 Teaching and Learning in the College Classroom                            3 hours
This course reviews the classic and recent research and addresses issues from diverse theoretical and philosophical perspectives including educationist, feminist, humanistic, psychological, sociological and anthropological.  General models and teaching styles are addressed, as is motivation.  Each section includes quantitative and qualitative research areas.

756 Public Policy Issues in Higher Education                                        3 hours
This course focuses on the relationship between the federal and state governments and the colleges and universities in the United States.  Topics include foundations of public policy and higher education: access, affordability, collaboration, reform, distance education and how all of these affect curriculum.

757 College and University Curriculum                                                 3 hours
This course serves to engage instructors, students and others in critical reflection and dialogue about curriculum, teaching and learning, and assessment issues in higher education.  The readings represent theoretical and applied concerns and challenge students to bridge those concerns by discovering and enacting intersections of theory and practice.

758 Faculty and Faculty Issues in Colleges and Universities                  3 hours
This course discusses demographic trends and addresses such topics as faculty roles, obligations and career issues; the relations of the development of higher education as an institution to the development of the professional life of faculty; and how scholars approach research questions from diverse and emerging perspectives and with heterogeneous methodologies.  The course includes issues that will face faculty and institutions in the future.

759 College Student Development Theory                                              3 hours
This course introduces students to key student development theories by reading original works of the theorists, developing an awareness of the context in which development occurs and examining applications of theory to practice.  This course will be especially useful for student affairs practitioners who work with college students and want to create programs and services to promote their learning, growth and development.

760 Independent Study in Higher Education                                       1-6 hours
In consultation with the instructor, students may choose additional topics of interest for in-depth study.

761 Education in a Culture of Change                                                               3 hours
This is a social reconstructivist course concerning the mutual cultural impact of schools and society.  Students will pay particular attention to change in the school environment. Comparative history will focus on results of major educational changes leading to modern impacts as a result of current trends and issues.

765 Curriculum and Teaching Methods                                                  3 hours
This course is an intensive study of differentiated instruction in connection with the latest valid research and foundational knowledge of human learning. It will include a distinct study of delivery systems and curricular models that can affect the most dynamic positive change for individual students. Field experience is required.

770 Advanced Educational Psychology                                                  3 hours
Advanced Educational Psychology connects developmental theories to practice.  It provides the scientific research to support educational pedagogy.

771 Current Trends in Assessment and Evaluation                                 3 hours
Students learn how to construct, validate and apply traditional tests of achievement.  In addition, forms of alternative and naturalistic assessment are considered.

772 Education Law                                                                                3 hours
This course is an intensive study of associated school law in the state of South Dakota and federal legal procedure and protocol.  It includes the study of school organization and employee-related case study for preschool through grade 12 and higher education.

773 Professional Development in Schools                                             3 hours
This course is an investigation of strategies for building community support, developing and selecting staff, and using the strengths of staff members.  It will also cover strategies for connecting curriculum to continued school achievement.

775 Educational Leadership                                                                  3 hours
This course will provide in-depth coverage of administrative and classroom organization, exploration of career-oriented possibilities within the education profession, including entrepreneur-related career paths, institutional reorganization, education advocacy and technically spurred change in professional choice.  An internship or project may be required. The course will cover the administration of preschool through grade 12.

779 Pre K-12 School Finance                                                                 3 hours
This course is a review of the field of educational finance, from both the theoretical and practical perspectives.  Emphasis is placed on discerning personal educational paradigms, understanding how educational structures or bureaucracies work and change, studying current challenges to educational institutions, and arriving at ways in which teachers can provide leadership within schools.

790 Research: Methodology                                                                   3 hours
This course will give graduate students knowledge of research methods.  They will develop skills in evaluating statistical data, learn procedures for completion of a thesis and develop an understanding of the essential elements of experimental and nonexperimental research studies.

795 Research                                                                                      1-6 hours
This course includes a research proposal, thesis and oral defense.  See the DWU Graduate Program Handbook.  This course may be repeated with permission.
Prerequisite: EDU 790.

796 Student Teaching 7-12                                                                     5 hours
Candidates will spend 14 weeks interning in the field with two purposes: refining previously selected research and training as a teacher under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and university supervisor.  Candidates will follow all protocol of the DWU Handbook.  Students will also complete a thesis during this professional semester with research focused on the field classroom.

797 Administrative Internship – Elementary                                            3 hours
Candidates will intern with a school administrator in a K-6, K-5 or 6-8 setting with appropriate evaluation and university supervision.

798 Administrative Internship – Secondary                                             3 hours
Candidates will intern with a school administrator in a 6-8, 7-12 or 9-12 setting with appropriate evaluation and university supervision.

799 Continuing Research                                                                        1 hour
Students will enroll in this course as they continue their thesis research. This course can be repeated for credit.  Grade is CR/NC.  Offered every semester.

Course Descriptions
Special Education (SPD)
701 The Diverse Classroom                                                                   3 hours
This course will examine steps in modification of the regular curriculum to meet the educational needs of individual students. It will also include consideration of designing classroom environments to accommodate all learners. Students will review current materials and equipment available for use in planning curriculum for a variety of learners. Students will study most current case law involving integration. Suggested methodology of differentiated instruction for both the K-8 and 7-12 learners will be discussed. Nine hours of field experience is required.

 

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